Executive Committee Fellows

Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science
Lila Abu-Lughod teaches anthropology and gender studies at Columbia University. She is a former director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, the Center for the Study of Social Difference, and the Middle East Institute, all at Columbia.
Professor of English and American Studies, Columbia University

Rachel Adams is the director of the “Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics and Culture.” She is Professor of English and American Studies at Columbia University, where she specializes in 19th- and 20th-century literatures of the United States and the Americas, media studies, theories of race, gender, and sexuality, medical humanities and disability studies.

Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Tina Campt is Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Director of the Africana Studies Program, Barnard College. Campt joined the Barnard faculty in 2010, prior to which she held faculty positions at Duke University, the University of California-Santa Cruz and the Technical University of Berlin.  An interdisciplinary scholar by necessity, her work theorizes gender, memory and racial formation among African Diasporic communities in Europe and Germany in particular.

Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference and Adjunct Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Laura Ciolkowski is Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference and Adjunct Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature. She is also Associate Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Columbia.
Director, Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, Columbia University

The current Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality (IRWGS), Patricia Dailey is a co-founder of the Junior Faculty Advisory Board, the ASSC, and the University Seminar on Affect Studies.

Executive Director, Heyman Center for the Humanities and Society of Fellows; Adjunct Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender

Eileen Gillooly is Executive Director of the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities and Adjunct Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Gillooly has a BA from Scripps College and a PhD from Columbia University. Her interests include nineteenth-century literature and culture in Britain and its colonies, gender studies, public humanities, justice studies, medical and health humanities, and literary and social theory.

Professor of Classics, English, and Comparative Literature, Columbia University
Stathis Gourgouris is a Professor of Classics, English, and Comparative Literature, Columbia University and former Director of the Comparative Institute for Literature and Society. Professor Gourgouris writes and teaches on a variety of subjects that ultimately come together around questions of the poetics and politics of modernity and democracy. He is the author of Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece (Stanford, 1996); Does Literature Think?

Halberstam works in the areas of popular, visual and queer culture with an emphasis on subcultures. Halberstam’s first book, Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters (1995), was a study of popular gothic cultures of the 19th and 20th centuries and it stretched from Frankenstein to contemporary horror film. Her 1998 book, Female Masculinity (1998), made a ground breaking argument about non-male masculinity and tracked the impact of female masculinity upon hegemonic genders.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Jean E. Howard is the George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University where she teaches early modern literature, Shakespeare, feminist studies, and theater history. Howard has authored over fifty essays; and her books include Shakespeare’s Art of Orchestration: Stage Technique and Audience Response (1984); The Stage and Social Struggle in Early Modern England (1994); Engendering a Nation: A Feminist Account of Shakespeare’s English Histories (1997), co-written with Phyllis Rackin; Theater of a City: The Places of London Comedy 1598-1642 (2007), which won the Barnard Hewitt Prize for the outstanding work of theater history for 2008, and Marx and Shakespeare in the Great Shakespeareans series (2012), co-written with Crystal Bartolovich.
Wun Tsun Tam Professor in the Humanities, Director, Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, Columbia University

Lydia H. Liu is a theorist of media and translation, a scholar of comparative literature, and a bilingual writer in Chinese and English. She is the Wun Tsun Tam Professor in the Humanities and the Director of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University.

Visiting Associate Professor in History

Premilla Nadasen is a visiting professor at Barnard College. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1999 and her B.A. from the University of Michigan. Her dissertation on the welfare rights movement was nominated from the Bancroft Award. Her book, Welfare Warriors: The Welfare Rights Movement in the United States (Routeledge 2005), outlines the ways in which African American women on welfare forged a feminism of their own out of the political and cultural circumstances of the late 1960s and 1970s.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race

Frances Negrón-Muntaner is an award-winning filmmaker, writer, curator, scholar and professor at Columbia University, where she is the director of Columbia’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race and founding director of the Media and Idea Lab. Among her books and publications are: Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the Latinization of American Culture (CHOICE Award, 2004), The Latino Media Gap (2014), and Sovereign Acts (forthcoming). Her most recent films include "Small City, Big Change" (2013), "War for Guam" (2015) and "Life Outside" (2016).

 

 

University Professor, Columbia Unversity

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is University Professor and Founder of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University.  She was educated at the University of Calcutta, and came to Cornell University in 1961 to finish doctoral work.

Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Neferti Tadiar is Professor and Chair of Women's Studies at Barnard College.  Her academic interests include transnational and third world feminisms; postcolonial theory; critical theories of race and subjectivity; literary and social theory; cultural studies of the Asia Pacific region; and Philippine studies. Her work concerns the role of cultural practice and social imagination in the production of wealth, power, marginality and liberatory movements in the context of global relations.

Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College, Columbia University
Paige West is Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University. Her broad scholarly interest is the relationship between societies and their environments. She has written about the linkages between environmental conservation and international development, the material and symbolic ways in which the natural world is understood and produced, the aesthetics and poetics of human social relations with nature, and the creation of commodities and practices of consumption. Since the mid 1990s she has worked with indigenous people in Papua New Guinea.