Faculty Fellows

Vaness Agard-Jones is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University, where she also serves on the Executive Council of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality.

She earned her Ph.D. from the joint program in Anthropology and French Studies at New York University and held a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia's Society of Fellows in the Humanities. From 2014-2016 she was on the faculty at Yale University.

Senior Research Fellow, Regional Institute for Population Studies, University of Ghana
Dr. Delali Margaret Badasu is a Senior Research Fellow at the Regional Institute for Population Studies, University of Ghana.
Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Princeton University
Benjamin Conisbee Baer is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University.
Assistant Professor of Social Work

Dr. Ballan's research, teaching and service is dedicated to individuals with disabilities.  Her research focuses on prevention and treatment interventions for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  She is the recipient of the prestigious 2010 Columbia University Presidential Teaching Award.  She has received the Texas Excellence Teaching Award, the Services for Students with Disabilities Faculty Award and twice, Columbia students bestowed her with the excellence in teaching award. Dr.

Anne Whitney Olin Professor of English, Barnard College

Professor Baswell rejoins the faculty at Barnard and Columbia after a period as Professor of English and Associate Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at UCLA, 2001-2008.  Baswell’s earliest research was in the reception and transformation of classical literature, especially narratives of empire and dynastic foundation, in the vernacular cultures of the European Middle Ages.  He has approached these issues through the optic of original manuscripts, and in the light of the multilingualism of medieval France and England.

Dean of Faculty and Professor of the Arts, School of the Arts

Carol Becker is Dean of Faculty and Professor of the Arts at Columbia University School of the Arts. She was previously Dean of Faculty and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs as well as Professor of Liberal Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She earned her B.A. in English literature from State University of New York at Buffalo and her PhD in English and American literature from the University of California, San Diego.

Helen Benedict is a novelist and journalist specializing in social injustice and war. Her most recent writings have focused on women soldiers, military sexual assault, and Iraqi refugees, and she is credited with breaking the story about the epidemic of sexual assault of military women serving in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Her articles and books on this subject – the novel “Sand Queen” (2011, Soho Press) and the non-fiction book, "The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq," (2009 and 2010, Beacon Press) -- won her the Ida B.

Seth Low Professor of History

Volker Berghahn, Seth Low Professor of History, specializes in modern German history and European-American relations. He received his M.A. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (1961) and his Ph.D. from the University of London (1964). He taught in England and Germany before coming to BrownUniversity in 1988 and to Columbia ten years later.

Professor of Political Science, Barnard College

Sheri E. Berman is professor of political science. Her main interests are European politics and political history, democracy and democratization, globalization, and the history of the left. Her two books have examined the role played by social democracy in determining political outcomes in 20th-century Europe. Her courses include Political Development; Making Democracy Work; and Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe.

Associate Professor, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Sociology, Barnard College, Columbia University

Elizabeth Bernstein is Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and of Sociology at Barnard College, Columbia University. With Janet Jakobsen, she currently serves as co-director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women’s project on Gender, Justice, and Neoliberal Transformations, a comparative and synthetic interdisciplinary project comprising researchers from ten countries.

Maxine Elliot Professor of Comparative Literature, Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley
Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature and the Co-director of the Program of Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley.
Associate Professor of History, Cornell University

My research interests have evolved over time.  I began with a very strong interest in African art and literature and gradually added  the colonial state, nationalism, women's history, and the African Diaspora, specifically the Anglophone Caribbean.  Most of my research and writing thus far has focused on women's social and economic history in colonial Nigeria.  My first book, The Bluest Hands: A Social and Economic History of Women Indigo Dyers in Western Nigeria, brought many of my interests together for it examined the transformation of indigo dyeing and textile production in Abeoku

Senior Program Manager

As Senior Program Manager, Rana Zincir Celal leads all aspects of programming for Columbia Global Centers | Turkey.

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Director of the Program in Narrative Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Rita Charon is Professor of Clinical Medicine and Director of the Program in Narrative Medicine at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. A general internist with a primary care practice in Presbyterian Hospital, Dr. Charon took a Ph.D. in English when she realized how central is telling and listening to stories to the work of doctors and patients. She directs the Narrative Medicine curriculum for Columbia's medical school and teaches literature, narrative ethics, and life-telling, both in the medical center and Columbia's Department of English.

Professor of English and Africana Studies

Yvette Christiansë is a South African-born poet, novelist, and scholar. She is the author of two books of poetry: Imprendehora (published in South Africa by Kwela Books/Snail Press 2009) and Castaway (Duke University Press, 1999).Imprendehora was a finalist for the Via Afrika Herman Charles Bosman Prize in 2010 and Castaway was a finalist in the 2001 PEN International Poetry Prize.

Director of the Oral History Research Office

Mary Marshall Clark is director of the Columbia Center for Oral History, the world’s oldest university-based oral history public archive. Clark, along with the sociologist Peter Bearman, undertook a large, longitudinal oral history project, “The September 11, 2001 Oral History Narrative and Memory Project,” a collection of 600 interviews with culturally and ethnically diverse New Yorkers differently affected by the afterlife of the September 11th events.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Department Chair

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley (1997); B.A., Williams College (1989). Sarah Cole specializes in British literature of the 19th and 20th centuries, with an emphasis on the modernist period. Areas of interest include war; violence, sexuality and the body; history and memory; imperialism; and Irish literature of the modernist period.

Instructor, Department of History, Florida International University

Dr. Cornelius's research examines the development of “racial science” during the nineteenth century. Her book manuscript titled /'More Approximate to the Animal:' African American Men and Women’s Resistance to the Rise of Scientific Racism in Mid-Nineteenth Century America/ provides a gendered analysis of the ways in which African Americans - enslaved and free, lettered and illiterate - addressed scientific theories of racial differences.

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Faculty, Program in Narrative Medicine, Columbia University; Faculty, Health Advocacy Graduate Program and Fiction Writing Program, Sarah Lawrence College

Sayantani DasGupta, MD MPH Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Faculty, Master's Program in Narrative Medicine, Columbia University. Faculty, Health Advocacy Graduate Program and Fiction Writing Program, Sarah Lawrence College.

Professor of French and Philosophy

Souleymane Bachir Diagne specializes in history of philosophy, Islamic philosophy, African philosophy and literature, and received his academic training in France. An alumnus of the École Normale Supérieure, he holds an agrégation in Philosophy (1978) and he took his Doctorat d’État in philosophy at the Sorbonne (1988) where he also took his BA (1977). Before joining Columbia University in 2008 he taught philosophy for many years at Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar (Senegal) and at Northwestern University.

Director, Institute for African Studies, Columbia University
Mamadou Diouf is the Leitner Family Professor of African Studies and the Director of Columbia University's Institute for African Studies.
Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Professor Edwards is the author of The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Harvard UP, 2003), which was awarded the John Hope Franklin Prize of the American Studies Association, the Gilbert Chinard prize of the Society for French Historical Studies, and runner-up for the James Russell Lowell Prize of the Modern Language Association. With Robert G. O'Meally and Farah Jasmine Griffin, he co-edited the collection Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies (Columbia UP, 2004).
Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University
Brent Hayes Edwards is a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He is the author of The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Harvard, 2003), which was awarded the John Hope Franklin Prize of the American Studies Association, the Gilbert Chinard Prize of the Society for French Historical Studies, and was runner-up for the James Russell Lowell Prize of the Modern Language Association. With Robert G.
Professor of Law

Elizabeth F. Emens is a Professor of Law at Columbia.  She teaches and researches in the areas of employment discrimination law, disability law, contracts, and law and sexuality.  She earned her BA and JD from Yale and her Ph.D. in English from King’s College, Cambridge.

Assistant Professor, Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Stemcell Transplantation, Columbia University Medical Center

Dr. Katie Ender is a pediatric hematologist and assistant professor in the Division of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation at Columbia University Medical Center.   Her primary clinical expertise and research experience have focused on sickle cell disease.  She has a Master’s of Science in Clinical Investigation from Northwestern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s of Science in Bioethics at Columbia University.  Dr.

Silver Professor of Anthropology, New York University
Sally Engle Merry is Silver Professor of Anthropology at New York University. She is also a Faculty Director of the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice at the New York University School of Law, and past president of the American Ethnological Society.
Professor, School of International and Public Affairs

Yasmine Ergas is Director of the Specialization on Gender and Public Policy, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs, and Associate Director of the Institute for the Study of Human Rights. A lawyer and sociologist, she has worked on issues regarding gender and women’s rights as a policy analyst and advisor, scholar and advocate.

Director, Institute For Religion, Culture, & Public Life

Katherine Pratt Ewing, Professor of Religion, is also Coordinator of the Master of Arts Program in the South Asia Institute. Until 2010, she was Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Religion at Duke University, where she served as the Executive Director of the North Carolina Consortium for South Asian Studies. In 2010-2011 she was Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison before moving to Columbia’s Religion Department in 2011.

Professor of Religion

Katherine Pratt Ewing is Professor of Religion and Director of the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life at Columbia University. She has carried out ethnographic fieldwork in Pakistan, Turkey, and India, and among Muslims in Europe and the United States.  Her research has focused on debates among Muslims about the proper practice of Islam in the modern world, the place of Muslims within the German national imaginary, and sexualities, gender, and the body in South Asia.

Assistant Professor of Music, Columbia University
Kevin Fellezs is an Assistant Professor of Music at Columbia University, where he shares a joint appointment in the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. His book titled Birds of Fire: Jazz, Rock, Funk and the Creation of Fusion (Duke University Press) is a study of fusion (jazz-rock-funk) music of the 1970s, which won the 2012 Woody Guthrie Book Award.
Professor of Law and Director, Center for the Study of Law and Culture, Columbia Law School

Since joining Columbia Law School's faculty in 2001 Professor Franke's research and teaching have increasingly focused on gender and racial equality and well as the regulation of sexuality in domestic, transnational and international contexts. In Sexual Tensions of Post Empire Professor Franke examined two contemporary cites - Cairo and Zimbabwe - in which state efforts to eradicate the traces of empire and to resurrect an authentic post-colonial nation have produced sexual subjects that serve as a kind of existential residue and remainder of a demonized colonial past and absence. 

Mitchell I. Ginsberg Professor of Contemporary Urban Problems, Columbia School of Social Work

Irwin Garfinkel is the co-founding director of the Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC). Of the 37 population research centers funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), CPRC is the only one to have been founded within a school of social work. Its signature area is children, youth, and families.

Digital Scholarship Coordinator for the Humanities and History Division, Columbia University Library

Alex Gil is Digital Scholarship Coordinator for the Humanities and History Division at Columbia University Library, Affiliate Faculty of the English and Comparative Literature Department, and one of the founders of the Studio@Butler, a technology atelier for faculty, students and librarians. He has published in journals across the Atlantic and the Americas, while sustaining an open and robust online research presence on the subject of digital humanities, textual scholarship, and Caribbean Studies. In 2010-2012 he was a fellow at the Scholars' Lab and NINES at the University of Virginia.

Associate Professor of French and Africana Studies

Kaiama L. Glover is Associate Professor of French and Africana Studies at Barnard College.

Professor of History, Cornell University

My research interests focus on West Africa and more specifically the social and cultural history of Ghana from the height of the Atlantic slave trade (in the 18th century) through the early colonial period (up to World War Two).  Of particular interest to me are changes in gender and ethnic relations, African belief systems and the history of slavery.

The courses I teach reflect these research interests as well as my fascination with Africa's encounter with other worlds (the Americas, Europe, the Islamic world, the Indian Ocean world). 

Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons
Ellen Greenebaum is Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Cell Biology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. She is a Clinical team member studying people who were children (in utero to 18 years old) at time of Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident April 26, 1986 to determine effect on thyroid.
Department of Africana and Puerto Rican/Latino Studies, Hunter College

Professor Gregg’s scholarly interests include Anglophone Caribbean literature, Caribbean women’s writing, Caribbean intellectual traditions, African American literature, and literature of the African Diaspora. Her publications include Jean Rhys’s Historical Imagination (1995) and Caribbean Women: An Anthology of Non-Fiction Writing (2005). 

Her forthcoming book is "This Past that Waits for Me.”  Anglophone Caribbean Women Writers and the Challenge of History.

William B. Ransford Professor of English & Comparative Literature and African-American Studies

B.A., Harvard (1985); Ph.D.,Yale (1992). Professor Griffin's major fields of interest are American and African American literature, music, history and politics. The recipient of numerous honors and awards for her teaching and scholarship, in 2006-2007 Professor Griffin was a fellow at the New York Public Library Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.

Associate Professor of Political Science, Barnard College and Columbia University

Ayten Gündoğdu is Associate Professor of Political Science at Barnard College-Columbia University. Her research draws on the resources of modern and contemporary political theory for the purposes of addressing problems related to human rights, migration, citizenship, and sovereignty. She has recently published Rightlessness in an Age of Rights: Hannah Arendt and the Contemporary Struggles of Migrants (Oxford University Press, 2015; ISA Theory Honorable Mention).

Lucyle Hook Chair, Professor of English and Africana Studies

Kim F. Hall joined the Barnard faculty in 2006.  Previously, she held the Thomas F.X. Mullarkey Chair of Literature at Fordham University.  She has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Swarthmore College, and Georgetown University.

Professor Hall's research and scholarship have been supported by the Folger Institute, the ACLS, and the Ford Foundation.  She has also received an NEH/Newberry Fellowship.

She is listed in Who's Who of American Women as well as Who's Who Among African Americans.

Royall Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Janet Halley is the Royall Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. She has a Ph.D. in English Literature from UCLA and a J.D. from Yale Law School. She has taught at Tel Aviv Buckmann School of Law and in the Law Department of the American University in Cairo. She is the author of Split Decisions: How and Why to Take a Break from Feminism (Princeton 2006), and Don’t: A Reader’s Guide to the Military’s Anti-Gay Policy (Duke 1999). With Wendy Brown, she coedited Left Legalism/Left Critique (Duke 2002), and with Andrew Parker she coedited After Sex?

Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science, and Director, Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought

Bernard E. Harcourt joined the Columbia University faculty in July 2014. His scholarship intersects social and political theory, the sociology of punishment, and penal law and procedure.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Women's and Gender Studies

Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Women's and Gender Studies. B. A., Wesleyan University (1984); Ph.D., Yale University (1992). Professor Hartman's major fields of interest are African American and American literature and cultural history, slavery, law and literature, and performance studies. She is on the editorial board of Callaloo. She has been a Fulbright, Rockefeller, Whitney Oates, and University of California President's Fellow.

Professor of Art History

Anne Higonnet teaches and writes about nineteenth century art, childhood, and collecting. A Harvard College B.A, she received her PhD from Yale University in 1988. She has published three books and dozens of articles on topics ranging from Impressionism to contemporary photography. Her many awards include Guggenheim, Getty, and Social Science Research Council fellowships, as well as grants from the Mellon, Howard, and Kress Foundations.

Jennifer Hirsch's principal areas of expertise are gender, sexuality, and reproductive health, U.S.-Mexico migration and migrant health, the comparative anthropology of love, and the applications of anthropological theory and methods to public health research and programs. She has published articles in journals such as American Journal of Public Health, Studies in Family Planning, AIDS, and Culture Health and Sexuality.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Marianne Hirsch is William Peterfield Trent Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and Professor in the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. She is immediate past president of the Modern Language Association of America. She was born in Romania, and educated at Brown University where she received her BA/MA and Ph.D. degrees. Before moving to Columbia, she taught at Dartmouth College.

Associate Professor, Spanish & Latin American Cultures

Maja Horn is Associate Professor and Chair of Spanish and Latin American Cultures at Barnard College. She specializes in contemporary Hispanophone Caribbean literature, visual and performance art, gender and sexuality, and political culture. She is the author of Masculinity after Trujillo: The Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature (University Press of Florida in 2014) and is currently completing a second monograph on queer Dominican literature, visual and performance art. She has also published on Latin American and Caribbean arts for various Dominican and U.S.

Lecturer, Program in Narrative Medicine

Marsha Hurst is on the faculty team of Columbia’s Program in Narrative Medicine and is a research scholar at Columbia University’s Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, where she is coordinating a faculty seminar on narrative genetics. She is also a consultant on health advocacy programs, issues, and education with particular interest in women’s health and aging. She has consulted for the Medicare Rights Center and is adviser to their advocacy programs, and works with the women’s health reform coalition, Raising Women’s Voices.

Villard Professor of German and Comparative Literature

Andreas Huyssen is the Villard Professor of German and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, where he served as founding director of the Center for Comparative Literature and Society (1998-2003). He chaired the Department of Germanic Languages from 1986-1992 and again from 2005-2008.

James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum

Turkuler Isiksel (Ph.D., Yale) works in contemporary political theory and is particularly interested in political institutions beyond the nation-state. Professor Isiksel combines the perspectives of normative theory, legal analysis, and institutionalist political science in her research. She is particularly interested in how descriptive and normative categories tailored to the nation-state apply to institutions that wield political power beyond that context.

Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Women's Gender and Sexuality Studies and Director, Center for Research on Women, Barnard College
Janet R. Jakobsen is Claire Tow Professor of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies and former Director of the Center for Research on Women at Barnard College, where she has also served as Dean for Faculty Diversity and Development.
Associate Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University

Art historian Dr. Kellie Jones is Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Archaeology, as well as the Institute for Research in African American Studies at Columbia University. Her research interests include African American and African Diaspora artists, Latino/a and Latin American Artists, and issues in contemporary art and museum theory.

Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Professor Jordan-Young is a sociomedical scientist whose research includes social epidemiology studies of HIV/AIDS, and evaluation of biological work on sex, gender and sexuality. Prior to joining the faculty at Barnard College, she was a Principal Investigator and Deputy Director of the Social Theory Core at the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research of the National Development and Research Institutes, Inc., and has been a Health Disparities Scholar sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Associate Professor of English and Director of the American Studies Program

Jennie A. Kassanoff is an Associate Professor of English at Barnard College where she directs the Program in American Studies.  She is the author of Edith Wharton and the Politics of Race (Cambridge, 2004) and is currently working on an essay on stupidity in the fiction of Henry James and a book on voting in American literature.

R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History Emerita

Alice Kessler-Harris, R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History. She is also Professor in the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Dr. Kessler-Harris specializes in the history of American labor and the comparative and interdisciplinary exploration of women and gender. She received her B. A. from Goucher College (1961) and her Ph.D. from Rutgers (1968).

Assistant Professor, Latin American Literature, Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, Stony Brook University
Lena Burgos Lafuente (PhD NYU, 2011) is Assistant Professor of Latin American Literature in the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, Stony Brook University. She specializes in poetry, Latin American essay writing, sound studies, and transatlantic literary crossings in the first half of the twentieth century.
Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College and Columbia University
Brian Larkin is Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University and the author of Signal and Noise: Media Infrastructure and Urban Culture in Nigeria (Duke University Press, 2008).  With Lila Abu-Lughod and Faye Ginsburg he co-edited Media Worlds: Anthropology on New Terrain (University of California Press, 2000). His research examines the introduction of media technologies in Nigeria – cinema, radio, digital media - and the religious, political, and cultural changes they bring about.
Professor, Acting Chair, and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Italian

Elizabeth Leake is professor, Acting Chair, and Director of Graduate Studies in the Italian Department at Columbia. Her research interests include Twentieth Century narrative and theatre, psychoanalytic, ideological, and disability studies in Italian literature, fascist Italy, Italian cinema, and early Danish cinema.

Assistant Professor of Luso-Brazilian Studies, Columbia University
Ana Paulina Lee is Assistant Professor of Luso-Brazilian Studies at Columbia University. Her research and teaching focus on the intersection of cultural studies and political philosophy, race relations and hemispheric American histories of slavery and immigration, Asian and African diasporic cultures in the Americas, performance and memory studies. Prior to joining the department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures, Lee was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Maxine Greene Professor of Education
Nancy Lesko's interests center around curriculum theory and history, conceptions of children and youth in theory and practice, gender issues in education, and citizenship education in times of war.
Assistant Professor of History

Natasha Lightfoot, Assistant Professor, Columbia University Department of History, teaches within the fields of Caribbean, Atlantic World, and African Diaspora History on the subjects of slavery, emancipation, race, and labor relations. She received her B.A.in History from Yale University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in History from New York University. Her current book project focuses on black working people's resistance in colonial British Antigua after emancipation.

Director, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race; Professor of Anthropology, CSER and Latino/a Studies

Claudio Lomnitz works on the history, politics and culture of Latin America, and particularly of Mexico. He received his PhD from Stanford in 1987, and his first book, Evolución de una sociedad rural (Mexico City, 1982) was a study of politics and cultural change in Tepoztlán, Mexico. After that he developed an interest in conceptualizing the nation-state as a kind of cultural region, a theme that culminated in Exits from the Labyrinth: Culture and Ideology in Mexican National Space (California, 1992).

Herbert Lehman Professor of Government MESAAS, International Affairs, and Anthropology

Mahmood Mamdani is the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1974 and specializes in the study of African history and politics. His works explore the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and the history and theory of human rights.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Sharon Marcus is Dean of Humanities and Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University as well as the co-founder and co-editor in chief of Public Books, a bimonthly review of books, arts, and ideas.  

Professor of Architecture, Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation
Reinhold Martin is Professor of Architecture at Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, where he directs the PhD program in architecture and the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture. He is a member of Columbia’s Institute for Comparative Literature and Society as well as the Committee on Global Thought. Martin is a founding co-editor of the journal Grey Room and has published widely on the history and theory of modern and contemporary architecture.

Mary McLeod is a Professor of Architecture at Columbia GSAPP, where she teaches architecture history and theory, and occasionally studio. She has also taught at Harvard University, University of Kentucky, University of Miami and the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies. Her research and publications have focused on the history of the modern movement and on contemporary architecture theory, examining issues concerning the connections between architecture and ideology.

Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Hlonipha Mokoena's main area of interest is South African intellectual history. One of the defining characteristics of South Africa is that it is a society that ostensibly lacks a collective history or shared philosophical and political traditions. The main objective of Professor Mokoena's teaching is to introduce students to the contested histories of South African political ideas and traditions.

Lecturer, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University
Ed Morales is an author and journalist who has written for The Nation, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Rolling Stone, the Guardian, and City Limits, among many others. He is a former Village Voice staff writer and Newsday columnist and the author of Living in Spanglish (St. Martins) and The Latin Beat (Da Capo Press), as well as the upcoming Raza Matters (Verso Press).
Professor of History, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis and the Department of History, New York University

Jennifer L. Morgan is the author of Laboring Women: Gender and Reproduction in the Making of New World Slavery (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004).  Her research examines the intersections of gender and race in colonial America.  She is at work on a project that considers colonial numeracy, racism, and the rise of the trans-Atlantic slave trade in the seventeenth-century English Atlantic, tentatively titled Accounting for the Women in Slavery.

Professor of Anthropology

Rosalind Morris focuses her fieldwork in two main areas: Thailand and South Africa. Over the past decade, she has devoted her attention to thinking about a number of inter-related issues and questions concerning: the history of modernity in Southeast Asia and the place of the mass media in its development; the relationships between value and violence; the sexualization of power and desire; the theorization of gender; and the history of anthropological thought and social theory. In her writings on all of these issues, she attends to questions of representation.

Professor of Comparative Literature, University of California, Los Angeles

Aamir Mufti is interested in understanding a range of forms of inequality in the contemporary world and how they impede the possibilities for historically autonomous action by social collectivities in the South. His work also explores the possibilities of critical knowledge of these societies within the dominant practices of the modern humanistic disciplines. Mufti has a Ph.D. in literature from Columbia University and was trained in Anthropology at Columbia, the London School of Economics, and Hamilton College.

Term Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College, Columbia University

Sarah Muir is Term Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College, Columbia University. Her work examines the practical logics of economic investment, ethical evaluation, and political critique, with a particular focus on social class and financial crisis. Situated at the intersection of semiotic, political-economic, and historical anthropology, her research is grounded in ethnographic fieldwork in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Dipali Mukhopadhyay teaches international security at the School of International and Public Affairs, where she is a faculty affiliate of the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies. She recently published the book Warlords, Strongman Governors and State Building in Afghanistan (Cambridge, 2014). Prior to joining SIPA and Saltzman, Mukhopadhyay spent 2011 as a post-doctoral fellow at Princeton University.

Associate Director, Barnard Center for Research on Women

Tami Navarro is a cultural anthropologist who holds a Ph.D. from Duke University. She is the Associate Director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women and Executive Editor of the Center’s online journal, Scholar and Feminist Online. Her work has been funded by the Mellon Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the American Anthropological Association, and the Ford Foundation. Dr. Navarro has held positions at Rutgers University, Wesleyan University, and Columbia University.

Associate Professor, Africana Studies and History, Barnard College
Celia E. Naylor is an Associate Professor in Africana Studies and History at Barnard College, Columbia University. Before joining the Barnard College faculty in 2010, she was Assistant Professor and then promoted to a tenured Associate Professor of History at Dartmouth College (2002-2010). 
 
Professor Naylor earned her B.A. in Africana Studies (Summa Cum Laude) from Cornell University, an M.A. in Afro-American Studies from UCLA, and an M.A. and Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology and Women and Gender Studies
Alondra Nelson is Professor in the Department of Sociology and Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at Columbia University. Nelson is the author of Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination (University of Minnesota Press, 2011), which was recognized with four scholarly awards, including the Mirra Komarovsky Book Award from the Eastern Sociological Society and theDistinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award from the American Sociological Association (Section on Race, Gender and Class). A finalist for the C. Wright Mills Award, Body and Soul is the first book-length exploration of the radical organization’s health-focused activities.
George Welwood Murray Professor of Legal History, Columbia Law School

Christina Duffy Ponsa is the George Welwood Murray Professor of Legal History at Columbia Law School, where she teaches constitutional law and American legal history. Professor Ponsa is the author of several articles on the constitutional law and history of American territorial expansion and empire, and co-editor of Foreign in a Domestic Sense: Puerto Rico, American Expansion, and the Constitution (Duke U. Press, 2001). She holds degrees from Princeton (A.B. 1990, Ph.D. 2010), Cambridge (M.Phil. 1995), and Yale (J.D. 1998).

Professor of Anthropology and Women's and Gender Studies

Elizabeth Povinelli's writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism. This critical task is grounded in theories of the translation, transfiguration and the circulation of values, materialities, and socialities within settler liberalisms. Her first two books focused on impasses within liberal systems of law and value as they meet local Australian indigenous worlds, and the effect of these impasses on the development of legal and public culture in Australia.

Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania

Eve M. Troutt Powell teaches the history of the modern Middle East. As a cultural historian, she emphasizes the exploration of literature and film in her courses. She is the author of A Different Shade of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain and the Mastery of the Sudan (University of California, 2003) and the co-editor, with John Hunwick, of The African Diaspora in the Mediterranean Lands of Islam (Princeton Series on the Middle East, Markus Wiener Press, 2002).

Assistant Professor of History and Afro American and African Studies, University of Michigan

Sherie Randolph is assistant professor of History and Afro American and African Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. The former Associate Director of the Women’s Research & Resource Center at Spelman College, Randolph received her Ph.D. from New York University in 19th- and 20th-century American history with concentrations in African Diaspora and women and gender history.

Associate Professor, History and Associate Director, Institute for Comparative Literature and Society
Anupama Rao has research and teaching interests in the history of anti-colonialism; caste and race; historical anthropology, social theory and intellectual history, and comparative urbanism. She is Senior Editor, Comparative Studies in South Asia, Africa and the Middle East. She has served as President, Society for the Advancement of South Asian History (American Historical Association), and on the South Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies. Her work has been supported by fellowships at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford) and the National Humanities Center (North Carolina), and by grants for the American Institute for Indian Studies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Professor and Chair, Institute for Comparative Literature and Society

Jesús Rodríguez-Velasco teaches Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Columbia. He has taught at the University of California, Berkeley, Universidad de Salamanca, Université de Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle), and the École Normale Supérieure (Lettres et Sciences Humaines). Among his publications are books and articles on Medieval and Early Modern knighthood, history of the book and reading, medieval political theory, law and culture, Occitan poetry, etc.

Assistant Professor of Clinical Bioethics, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Maya Sabatello is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Bioethics, at the Department of Psychiatry, and a Lecturer, at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University. A lawyer with a PhD in political science, and post-doctoral training from Harvard Medical School and Columbia University Medical Center, she specializes in bioethics, medical ethics, disability studies, international law and comparative human rights.

Term Assistant Professor of Practice, Sociology, Barnard College

J.C. Salyer is an anthropologist and a lawyer whose work focuses on law and society, immigration law, and social justice.   He is also the staff attorney for the Arab-American Family Support Center, a community-based organization in Brooklyn, and runs the organization’s immigration clinic.  His current research focuses on migration, disruption, and displacement related to climate change in the southwestern Pacific.

Associate Director, Barnard Center for Research on Women

Catherine Sameh is Associate Director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women, and managing editor of The Scholar & Feminist Online. She is also in charge of transnational collaborations with peer centers globally.

Professor of Anthropology

David Scott is Professor of Anthropology and Fellow in the Institute for Research in African American Studies, Columbia University, New York.

Professor of History, University of Florida

Professor Jon Sensbach received his Ph.D. in 1991 in early American history from Duke University, his B.A. in 1980 from the University of Virginia. He joined the University of Florida Department of History in 1998 after teaching at the College of William and Mary and the University of Southern Mississippi. He teaches the Department’s foundation graduate course on early America and has recently taught a graduate seminar on the Black Atlantic as well as undergraduate courses on the Atlantic slave trade, colonial America, and the American Revolution.

Executive Director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma

Bruce Shapiro is Executive Director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, a project of Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism encouraging innovative reporting on violence, conflict and tragedy worldwide. An award-winning reporter on human rights, criminal justice and politics, Shapiro is a contributing editor at The Nation and U.S. correspondent for Late Night Live on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Radio National.

Assistant Professor of Sociology and African American Studies, Columbia University

Carla Shedd is Assistant Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Columbia University. Her research and teaching interests focus on: crime and criminal justice; race and ethnicity; law; inequality; and urban sociology. Shedd has been published in the American Sociological Review, Sociological Methods & Research. She is the author of Unequal City: Race, Schools, & Perceptions of Injustice (2015).

Professor of Anthropology, BRAC University
Dina M. Siddiqi divides her time between New York and Dhaka, where she is Professor of Anthropology, BRAC University.
Associate Professor, Anthropology, Columbia University

Audra Simpson is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. She is the author of Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States (Duke University Press, 2014), winner of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association’s Best First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies Prize, the Laura Romero Prize from the American Studies Association as well as the Sharon Stephens Prize from the American Ethnological Society (2015). She is co-editor of Theorizing Native Studies (Duke University Press, 2014).

Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature
Joseph Slaughter teaches and publishes in the fields of postcolonial literature and theory, African, Caribbean, and Latin American literatures, postcolonialism, narrative theory, human rights, and 20th-century ethnic and third world literatures. His many publications include articles in Human Rights Quarterly, Research in African Literatures, The Journal of Human Rights, Politics and Culture, Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature. His essay, “Enabling Fictions and Novel Subjects: The Bildungsroman and International Human Rights Law,” appeared in a special issue on human rights of PMLA (October 2006) and was honored as one of the two best articles published in the journal in 2006-7.
Associate Professor of Journalism
Alisa Solomon directs the Arts & Culture concentration in the M.A. program at the Journalism School.
Associate Professor of English, Columbia University and Barnard College; Associate Director, Program in Narrative Medicine

Maura Spiegel has a joint appointment at Columbia University and Barnard College where she teaches literature, film and American Studies.  Associate director of the Program for Narrative Medicine at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, she teaches film to second-year medical students, as well as graduate students in the Master of Science Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia.  Recently she ran a writing workshop for the staff of the NYU/Bellevue Program for Survivor’s of Torture.

Adjunct Professor, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race & Department of Anthropology
Elsa Stamatopoulou is Adjunct Professor, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race & Department of Anthropology as well as Director, Indigenous Peoples' Rights Program at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University. Born in Athens, Greece, Stamatopoulou has devoted 21 years of her UN work to human rights, in addition to several years exclusively focusing on Indigenous Peoples rights.

Sarah Stillman is a staff writer at The New Yorker magazine, and director of the Global Migration Program at Columbia Journalism School. She has written on topics ranging from asset forfeiture abuse to the return of debtors prisons, and from Mexico's drug cartels to Bangladesh's garment factories. Her coverage of human trafficking on U.S. military bases in Iraq and Afghanistan won the National Magazine Award, the Michael Kelly Award for the “fearless pursuit and expression of truth,” and the Hillman Prize for Magazine Journalism, among other prizes.

Nash Professor of Law

Kendall Thomas is the Nash Professor of Law and co-founder and Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Culture at Columbia University in the City of New York. He joined the faculty in 1984 and his teaching and research interests include U.S. and comparative constitutional law, human rights, legal philosophy, feminist legal theory, Critical Race Theory and Law and Sexuality.

Assistant Professor of Economics, Barnard College

Anja Tolonen is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Barnard College. She works on economic development, with a specific focus on gender. Her recent work focuses on the local welfare effects of natural resource extraction in Africa, where she explores how mining investments affect employment inequality, women’s empowerment, and health. She teaches Development Economics and Women in Development Economics at Barnard.

Class of 1933 Professor in the Humanities, Department of English & Comparative Literature

Gauri Viswanathan is Class of 1933 Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University.  She has published widely on education, religion, and culture; nineteenth-century British and colonial cultural studies; and the history of modern disciplines. She has held numerous visiting chairs, among them the Beckman Professorship at Berkeley, and was recently an Affiliated Fellow at the American Academy in Rome and a Visiting Mellon Scholar at the University of Cape Town. She has received Guggenheim, NEH, and Mellon fellowships, and was a fellow at various international research institutes. Prof.

Robert D. and Leslie Kay Raven Professor of Law in Access to Justice, University of California, Berkeley Law

Leti Volpp is the Robert D. and Leslie Kay Raven Professor of Law in Access to Justice at University of California, Berkeley Law. A noted scholar in law and the humanities who writes about citizenship, migration, culture and identity, Volpp’s honors include two Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowships, a MacArthur Foundation Individual Research and Writing Grant, and the Association of American Law Schools Minority Section Derrick A. Bell, Jr., Award.

Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies, Columbia University

Jennifer Wenzel is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University. Areas of interest include: postcolonial theory and decolonization; African and South Asian literatures; environmental humanities; energy studies. Wenzel received her B.A. in English and History from Austin College in 1990; her M.A. in English from Indiana University in 1992; and her Ph.D. in English/Ethnic and Third World Literatures from the University of Texas at Austin in 1998.

James L. Dohr Professor of Law

B.A., Wellesley, 1972; J.D., Harvard, 1975. Practiced as deputy city attorney, Office of the Los Angeles City Attorney; and as staff lawyer, Western Center on Law and Poverty. Has served on the faculties of the University of Wisconsin School of Law, City University of New York Law School, and Golden Gate University School of Law. Has been at Columbia since 1991. Fellow, at the School of Criticism and Theory, Dartmouth College, and at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Associate Professor of Architecture, Planning and Preservation

Mabel O. Wilson navigates her multidisciplinary practice between the fields of architecture, art, visual cultural analysis, and American studies. Her scholarly and design research investigates space and cultural memory in black America, race and visual culture, and new technologies and the social production of space. Her scholarly essays have appeared in numerous journals and books on critical geography, cultural memory, art and architecture.

Associate Professor of Gender, Conflict and Development, International Institute of Social Studies, The Hague
Dubravka Zarkov is Associate Professor of Gender, Conflict and Development at the International Institute of Social Studies, The Hague.