Current Projects

September 15, 2012
Women Creating Change engages distinguished feminist scholars across Columbia’s many schools to focus on how contemporary global problems affect women and the role women play in addressing those problems. There are currently four Women Creating Change working groups: "Gender & the Global Slum," "Gender, Religion & Law in Muslim Societies," "Women Mobilizing Memory," and "Re-thinking Vulnerability: Feminism & Social Change." Each working group uses the resources of Columbia’s Global Centers to develop international networks of scholars and activists working on pressing problems of gendered inequity.
Teatro de la Candelaria
This project engages some of the most pressing debates of our time, questions about the beginning and end of life, prenatal testing, abortion, euthanasia, eugenics, technologies for the medical correction and “cure” of the non-normative body, disease, wartime injuries, post-traumatic stress, and healthcare. The study of disability also forces us to interrogate charged ethical and political questions about the meaning of aesthetics and cultural representation, bodily identity, and dynamics of social inclusion and/or exclusion.
Social Rights After the Welfare State explores the implications of the declining welfare state for American politics, gender and race relations, and the future of American democracy.
The Digital Black Atlantic Project (DBAP) is a multi-institutional and interdisciplinary working group that has come together to invent a scholarly resource and digital platform for multimedia explorations and documentations of literary texts, visual documents, sites, moments, rituals and ceremonies, monuments and memorials, performances, and material objects emerging out of and concerning the Black Atlantic world.
This working group will consider a series of linked questions about the social, cultural, and scientific nature of the sexed and raced body. This project uses the specific focus on sex-testing of elite athletes as a lab for considering larger questions related to social difference and the intersections of scientific and sociocultural perspectives on the sexed and raced body. Sex-testing provides an excellent focal point for exploring how an entangled and intersectional view of sex, gender, and other social formations might be relevant to contemporary matters of science and social policy.