People

Sara AbabnehVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor, Center for Strategic Studies, University of Jordan
Sara Ababneh is an assistant professor at the Center for Strategic Studies at the University of Jordan, the coordinator of the internship program and the coordinator of the Arab Barometer. In Fall 2013, Ababneh taught a masters course in International Relations Theory at the Faculty of International Studies and Political Science at the University of Jordan. In addition, she has taught courses on Gender Politics in the Arab World to study abroad students at the CIEE in the past and was the faculty host of the Interdisciplinary Faculty Development Seminar entitled “Jordan: Women and Gender in Light of the Arab Spring” in the summer of 2013.
Bürge AbiralGraduate Student
Cultural Studies, Sabanci University

Bürge Abiral is a PhD candidate in Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University. She received her BA from Williams College and her MA in Cultural Studies from Sabancı University, Turkey. Her research interests include human- environment relations, climate change, agriculture, political violence, and gender and sexuality. Her translation of Toward an Anthropology of Women (ed.

Mimi AbramovitzVisiting Faculty
Bertha Capen Reynolds Chair, Social Welfare Policy at the Silberman School of Social Work, Hunter College

Mimi Abramovitz is Bertha Capen Reynolds Professor at the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College. She has published widely on issues related to women, poverty, human rights and the U.S/ Welfare State. Professor Abramovitz is currently writing a book on the history of low-income women’s activism in the U.S.

Lila Abu-LughodExecutive Committee
Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Social Science
Lila Abu-Lughod teaches anthropology and gender studies at Columbia University. She is a former director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender, the Center for the Study of Social Difference, and the Middle East Institute, all at Columbia.
Hülya AdakVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, Sabancı University

Hülya Adak is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Sabancı University. She has published essays on Ottoman-Turkish memoirs and biographies, national myths, gender and sexuality, and the Armenian deportations during World War I in leading journals such as the South Atlantic Quarterly, PMLA, Biography, and New Perspectives on Turkey.

Rachel AdamsExecutive Committee
Professor of English and American Studies, Columbia University

Rachel Adams is the director of the “Precision Medicine: Ethics, Politics and Culture.” She is Professor of English and American Studies at Columbia University, where she specializes in 19th- and 20th-century literatures of the United States and the Americas, media studies, theories of race, gender, and sexuality, medical humanities and disability studies.

Neera AdarkarVisiting Faculty
Architect

Neera Adarkar is a practicing architect and an urban researcher. After her graduation in architecture from Sir J. J. College of Architecture, Mumbai University, Neera completed her post-graduation in Industrial Design from I.I.T. Powai, Mumbai. Currently she is a visiting faculty member in the Academy of Architecture, Rachana Sansad in Mumbai.

Fariba AdelkhahVisiting Faculty
Senior Research Fellow, Institut d'Études Politiques (Sciences Po), Paris

Fariba Adelkhah is Senior Research Fellow at Sciences Po in Paris. She received her Ph.D. in anthropology from Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS, 1989).  An anthropologist, her main research interests focus on the relationships and interplay between social changes and political transformations throughout the second half of the 20th century in Iran.

Fatemeh AdlparvarGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Fatemeh Adlparvar is a recent graduate of the Narrative Medicine program. She will begin her graduate studies at the Mailman School of Public Health where she hopes to study the intersections of narrative medicine, social work, and public health. She received her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley with a major in Environmental Science with an Education minor. She went on to complete her MSW at Columbia School of Social Work, with a minor in Law and a concentration in health, mental health, & disability.

Dina AfriantyVisiting Faculty
Research and Lecturer, Social and Political Sciences, State Islamic University (UIN) Jakarta

Dina is an Endeavor Post-doctoral fellow at Melbourne Law School University of Melbourne. Dina earned her PhD also from the University of Melbourne writing a thesis on the work of Local Women’s NGOs in Reforming Islamic Law introduced in 1999 in the Province of Aceh. Dina’s research interests include women’s rights, women’s movement, Islamic education, international development, and legal reform in Muslim societies.

Vaness Agard-Jones is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University, where she also serves on the Executive Council of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality.

She earned her Ph.D. from the joint program in Anthropology and French Studies at New York University and held a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia's Society of Fellows in the Humanities. From 2014-2016 she was on the faculty at Yale University.

Flavia AgnesVisiting Faculty
Lawyer

Flavia Agnes is a women's rights lawyer and writer and has been actively involved in the women's movement for the last two decades. She has written extensively on issues of domestic violence, feminist jurisprudence and minority rights. Her books are widely acclaimed and are popular among advocates, paralegal workers, law students and women who have been victims of domestic violence. Currently she co-ordinates the legal centre of MAJLIS and is also engaged in her doctoral research on Property Rights of Married Women with the National Law School of India.

Meltem AhıskaVisiting Faculty
Professor of Sociology, Boğaziçi University
Meltem Ahiska is Associate Professor in Sociology at Bogazici University, Istanbul. She has a PhD from the University of London.
Attiya AhmadVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Anthropology, George Washington University

Dr. Attiya Ahmad is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the George Washington University (Washington DC, USA). Broadly conceived, her research focuses on the interrelation between gender, labour migration, diasporic formations, cosmopolitanism, and Islamic movements crosscutting the Arab Gulf States and South Asia.  Dr.

Gazi Nafis AhmedVisiting Faculty
Gazi Nafis Ahmed is an artist working with photography. Born in Dhaka, Bangladesh, he studied art and design at London Guildhall University, United Kingdom. He received his B.A. from Danish School of Media and Journalism in Denmark and her M.A. in fine arts photography from IED Madrid in Spain, both on full scholarship. Ahmed was awarded at the international Pride Photo Award 2015 in Amsterdam for his series "Inner Face".
Zahra AliGraduate Student

Zahra Ali is a PhD student in sociology at EHESS and IFPO. Specialized in Islamic studies and gender studies, particularly through the thematics Gender and Islam, Gender and the Middle East. Her research focuses on the emergence of a Muslim Feminist dynamic occuring in the West and the Muslim world. She works on the women movement in the Arab World, especially in Iraq where she started her research in 2010.

Ayşe Gül AltınayVisiting Faculty
Professor of Anthropology, Sabancı University

Ayşe Gül Altınay received her Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology from Duke University and has been teaching at Sabancı University since 2001. Her research and writing have focused on militarism, nationalism, violence, memory, gender, and sexuality.

R. Ertuğ AltınayGraduate Student
Performance Studies, NYU

Rüstem Ertuğ Altınay is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and Sociology, and his M.A. degree in Philosophy from Bogazici University. Ertuğ’s primary fields of research are the politics of gender and sexuality in Turkey, with a focus on artistic and everyday performance, visual practices, fashion, and queer historiography.

Constanza Ambiado CortesVisiting Faculty
Historian, Universidad de Chile
Kata ÁmonGraduate Student
PhD Student, Sociology and Social Policy, Corvinus University of Budapest
Margaret Araneo-ReddyVisiting Faculty
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Theater, Brooklyn College

Margaret Araneo-Reddy is a New York-based scholar and theatre artist. She is currently a doctoral candidate at the Graduate Center, City University of New York and an Instructor of Drama at New York University. Her current research focuses on the intersection of neuropsychology and popular performance in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Using a cultural model of disability, Margaret examines the ways the small forms of cabaret and vaudeville (in Paris and New York respectively) both represent and embody neurological diversity in performance.

Adrienne AschVisiting Faculty
Edward and Robin Milstein Professor of Bioethics, Yeshiva University; Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and Family and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Dr. Adrienne Asch is the Edward and Robin Milstein Professor of Bioethics and Director of the Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University, as well as Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health and Family and Social Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Asch provides overall leadership to the Center for Ethics. In addition, she teaches courses throughout the university on bioethics and professional ethics. She publishes widely in books and peer-reviewed journals and presents at conferences throughout the world on issues related to her teaching and research.

Athena AthanasiouVisiting Faculty
Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Greece

Athena Athanasiou teaches at the Department of Social Anthropology at Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, in Athens, Greece. She has studied history, archaeology and philosophy at the Universities of Athens and Thessaloniki, Greece. She has received her Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from the New School for Social Research, in New York, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women, at Brown University, USA (2001-2002).

George AumoitheGraduate Student
PhD Student, History

George Aumoithe focuses on 20th century American history and the history of public health, science, and medicine. He received his B.A. from Bowdoin College with a double major in history and Africana studies and a minor in gay and lesbian studies. His studies were supported by the Mellon-Mays Undergraduate Fellowship and Point Foundation , the national LGBTQ scholarship.

Senior Research Fellow, Regional Institute for Population Studies, University of Ghana
Dr. Delali Margaret Badasu is a Senior Research Fellow at the Regional Institute for Population Studies, University of Ghana.
Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Princeton University
Benjamin Conisbee Baer is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Princeton University.
Assistant Professor of Social Work

Dr. Ballan's research, teaching and service is dedicated to individuals with disabilities.  Her research focuses on prevention and treatment interventions for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  She is the recipient of the prestigious 2010 Columbia University Presidential Teaching Award.  She has received the Texas Excellence Teaching Award, the Services for Students with Disabilities Faculty Award and twice, Columbia students bestowed her with the excellence in teaching award. Dr.

Anne Whitney Olin Professor of English, Barnard College

Professor Baswell rejoins the faculty at Barnard and Columbia after a period as Professor of English and Associate Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at UCLA, 2001-2008.  Baswell’s earliest research was in the reception and transformation of classical literature, especially narratives of empire and dynastic foundation, in the vernacular cultures of the European Middle Ages.  He has approached these issues through the optic of original manuscripts, and in the light of the multilingualism of medieval France and England.

Mia BayVisiting Faculty
Associate Director of the Rutgers Center for Race and Ethnicity, Rutgers University

Mia Bay is a historian who teaches at Rutgers University, where she also serves as the Associate Director of the Rutgers Center for Race and Ethnicity. The author of a number of works, including The White Image in the Black Mind: African American Ideas about White People 1830-1925 (2000), she has recently completed a new book entitled To Trouble the Waters Freely: The Life and Times of Ida B. Wells (2009).

Odelia BayGraduate Student
Columbia Law School

Odelia Bay is a master’s student at Columbia Law School where she hopes to specialize in disability rights in North America, with a focus on comparative constitutional and civil rights jurisprudence. Odelia received her J.D. from the University of Ottawa in Canada and was admitted to the Ontario bar in 2012.  She worked with one of Canada’s leading labor and civil rights law firms and has also participated in disability-related work with the Canadian Human Rights Commission and a community legal clinic in Ottawa.

Asef BayatVisiting Faculty
Catherine and Bruce Bastian Professor of Global and Transnational Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Asef Bayat, the Catherine and Bruce Bastian Professor of Global and Transnational Studies, teaches Sociology and Middle Eastern studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He was the Academic Director of the International Institute for the Study of Islam in the Modern World (ISIM) and ISIM Chair of Islam and the Modern World at Leiden University from 2003 until 2009. He writes on Egypt and Iran, and has published widely on issues of political sociology, social movements, urban space and politics, religious politics, contemporary Islam, and the Muslim Middle East. His latest book is: Life as Politics: How Ordinary People Change the Middle East (2013, 2nd edition).
Dean of Faculty and Professor of the Arts, School of the Arts

Carol Becker is Dean of Faculty and Professor of the Arts at Columbia University School of the Arts. She was previously Dean of Faculty and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs as well as Professor of Liberal Arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She earned her B.A. in English literature from State University of New York at Buffalo and her PhD in English and American literature from the University of California, San Diego.

Jonathan BellerVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of English and Humanities, Pratt Institute

Jonathan Beller is Professor of English and Humanities and Critical and Visual Studies, Pratt Institute.  He is the author of The Cinematic Mode of Production: Towards A Political Economy of the Society of the Spectacle, (Lebanon: Dartmouth College/University Press of New England, 2006) and Acquiring Eyes: Philippine Visuality, Nationalist Struggle and The World Media-System, (Manila: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2006).

Helen Benedict is a novelist and journalist specializing in social injustice and war. Her most recent writings have focused on women soldiers, military sexual assault, and Iraqi refugees, and she is credited with breaking the story about the epidemic of sexual assault of military women serving in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Her articles and books on this subject – the novel “Sand Queen” (2011, Soho Press) and the non-fiction book, "The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving in Iraq," (2009 and 2010, Beacon Press) -- won her the Ida B.

Joshua BennettGraduate Student
Department of English, Princeton University

Joshua Bennett is a second-year doctoral candidate in the Department of English at Princeton University. His academic interests include but are not limited to: black studies, disability studies, affect, animal studies, and 19th century Afro-Protestantism(s).  In addition to his graduate work at Princeton, Joshua is a also a full-time performance artist, and has recited his original work at events such as The Sundance Film Festival, the NAACP Image Awards, the ESPN documentary "One Night in Vegas," and President Obama's Evening of Poetry and Music at The White House.

James BergerVisiting Faculty
Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English, Yale University

James Berger is Senior Lecturer in American Studies and English at Yale University.  He is author of After the End: Representations of Post-Apocalypse and editor of Helen Keller's The Story of My Life: The Restored Edition.  He is currently completing The Disarticulate: Language, Impairment, and the Narratives of Modernity, to be published by New York University Press.

Seth Low Professor of History

Volker Berghahn, Seth Low Professor of History, specializes in modern German history and European-American relations. He received his M.A. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (1961) and his Ph.D. from the University of London (1964). He taught in England and Germany before coming to BrownUniversity in 1988 and to Columbia ten years later.

Sara BergstresserVisiting Faculty
Visiting Lecturer, Anthropology, Boston University

Sara Bergstresser is a medical and cultural anthropologist, and she is currently a Visiting Lecturer in Anthropology at Boston University. Her research addresses the intersection of health and society, including mental health policy and stigma, global bioethics, and religion and health. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from Brown University and an MPH from Harvard University. She is also working on an M.S. in Bioethics at Columbia on a part-time basis.

Professor of Political Science, Barnard College

Sheri E. Berman is professor of political science. Her main interests are European politics and political history, democracy and democratization, globalization, and the history of the left. Her two books have examined the role played by social democracy in determining political outcomes in 20th-century Europe. Her courses include Political Development; Making Democracy Work; and Democracy and Dictatorship in Europe.

Associate Professor, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Sociology, Barnard College, Columbia University

Elizabeth Bernstein is Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and of Sociology at Barnard College, Columbia University. With Janet Jakobsen, she currently serves as co-director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women’s project on Gender, Justice, and Neoliberal Transformations, a comparative and synthetic interdisciplinary project comprising researchers from ten countries.

Urmila BhirdikarVisiting Faculty
Professor, Delhi University

Urmila Bhirdikar has MA in English and Sociology, M Phil in English and has recently submitted her Ph D thesis entitled “ A Sociological Study of the Practice of Female Impersonation in Marathi Theatre in the 19th and Early 20th Century”, from the Department of Sociology, University of Delhi. She has taught English literature in H V Desai College Pune and in Mahindra United World College of India, Pune. She has trained in North Indian Classical vocal music and was invited to teach a course in Music and Modernity at JNU in 2006 and 2010.

Lisa BjorkmanVisiting Faculty

Lisa Björkman received her PhD in political science from the New School for Social Research in New York City in 2011. Her research explores the politics of water access in the Indian city of Mumbai, with a particular focus on the infrastructural effects of the city’s rapidly-changing built environment, and on emergent forms of political subjectivity and political possibility. She is presently based in Mumbai, where she is studying the role of political spectacle and ethno-religious discourse in municipal election campaigning.

Yarimar BonillaVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of Anthropology and Caribbean Studies, Rutgers University
Yarimar Bonilla is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University.
Sarah BrackeVisiting Faculty

Sarah Bracke is Assistant Professor of Sociology of Religion and Culture at the Faculty of Social Sciences at the KULeuven. She studied sociology at the Catholic University of Leuven and holds a PhD in Women’s Studies from Utrecht University (2004, Women Resisting Secularisation in an Age of Globalisation. Four Case-studies in a European Context), was a Marie Curie fellow at the University of California Santa Cruz and Utrecht University (2006-2008), and is currently a fellow at the Centre for Humanities at Utrecht University.

Maxine Elliot Professor of Comparative Literature, Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature, University of California, Berkeley
Judith Butler is Maxine Elliot Professor in the Departments of Rhetoric and Comparative Literature and the Co-director of the Program of Critical Theory at the University of California, Berkeley.
Associate Professor of History, Cornell University

My research interests have evolved over time.  I began with a very strong interest in African art and literature and gradually added  the colonial state, nationalism, women's history, and the African Diaspora, specifically the Anglophone Caribbean.  Most of my research and writing thus far has focused on women's social and economic history in colonial Nigeria.  My first book, The Bluest Hands: A Social and Economic History of Women Indigo Dyers in Western Nigeria, brought many of my interests together for it examined the transformation of indigo dyeing and textile production in Abeoku

Christopher CadhamGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
Christopher is a second year Master of Public Health student at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences. His certificate is in History, Ethics and Law. He received a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. His research interest is in using ethics to assess how policies in the fields of public health and medicine work to balance efficacy, efficiency, and effectiveness.
Dilara ÇalışkanVisiting Faculty
Cultural Studies, Sabancı University

Dilara Çalışkan is currently working at Sabancı University’s Gender and Women’s Studies Forum. In 2014, she graduated from Sabancı University’s Cultural Studies Master Program with a thesis titled “Queer Mothers and Daughters: The Role of Queer Kinship in the Everyday Lives of Trans Sex Worker Women in Istanbul.” Since 2010, she has been involved with Istanbul’s LGBTI Solidarity Association, which particularly focuses on human rights violations based on sexual orientation and gender identity, opposes the criminalization of sex work, and supports its recognition as work.

Tina CamptExecutive Committee
Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Tina Campt is Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Director of the Africana Studies Program, Barnard College. Campt joined the Barnard faculty in 2010, prior to which she held faculty positions at Duke University, the University of California-Santa Cruz and the Technical University of Berlin.  An interdisciplinary scholar by necessity, her work theorizes gender, memory and racial formation among African Diasporic communities in Europe and Germany in particular.

Hazel CarbyVisiting Faculty
Professor of African American Studies and American Studies, Yale University

Hazel Carby is the Charles C. and Dorothea S. Dilley Professor of African American Studies, Professor of American Studies, and Director of the Initiative on Race Gender and Globalization at Yale University.  Her books include Reconstructing Womanhood (OUP, 1987), Race Men (Harvard, 1998), and Cultures in Babylon (Verso, 1999).

Todd CarmodyVisiting Faculty
Lecturer on History and Literature, Harvard University
Todd Carmody is a Lecturer on History & Literature at Harvard University, where he teaches broadly in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American and African American literature and in disability studies. He previously held an ACLS New FacultyFellowship in UC Berkeley’s Department of English and a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellowship from Harvard’s W.E.B.
Leonard CassutoVisiting Faculty
Professor of English, Fordham University

Leonard Cassuto, a professor of English at Fordham University, has been teaching and writing about disability since Rosemarie Garland-Thomson lighted his path into the field more than fifteen years ago.  His most recent piece is “Disability Studies 2.0,” which appeared in American Literary History in 2010.

Henry CastilloGraduate Student
Cultural Studies, NYU

Henry Castillo is a doctoral student in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University. He holds a B.A. in Applied Linguistics (Honors) fromt he University of California--Los Angeles and an M.A. in Performance Studies form New York University. His research interests include race and ethnicitiy; women, gender, and sexuality; memory and "Intangible Cultural Heritage" in the Americas; Blackness in Latin America; and Afro-Colombian "heritage" practices and performance.

Senior Program Manager

As Senior Program Manager, Rana Zincir Celal leads all aspects of programming for Columbia Global Centers | Turkey.

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Director of the Program in Narrative Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Rita Charon is Professor of Clinical Medicine and Director of the Program in Narrative Medicine at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. A general internist with a primary care practice in Presbyterian Hospital, Dr. Charon took a Ph.D. in English when she realized how central is telling and listening to stories to the work of doctors and patients. She directs the Narrative Medicine curriculum for Columbia's medical school and teaches literature, narrative ethics, and life-telling, both in the medical center and Columbia's Department of English.

Ruchi ChaturvediVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Hunter College

Ruchi Chaturvedi received her Ph.D. in Anthropology from Columbia University in 2007. Ruchi’s research focuses on questions of political violence, popular politics and its contentious relationship with the ideology and institutions of liberal democracy. The lifeworlds of local level political workers of the Marxist Left and Hindu Right in Kerala, South India, their acts and experiences of violence, and the criminal courts where these workers have been tried have been Ruchi’s key ethnographic resources so far.

Stephanie ChenGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University

Stephanie Chen, B.A., is currently working at the Center for OCD and Related Disorders on studies relating to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) at New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI). Stephanie graduated from Rutgers University with a degree in Psychology in 2012. Prior to joining the Anxiety Disorders Clinic at NYSPI, she coordinated a joint-project study on medication adherence at Mount Sinai Hospital and Columbia University. Stephanie’s research interest is finding the most effective treatments for anxiety disorders. After completing her M.A.

Anne ChengVisiting Faculty
Professor of English and the Associate Chair in the Department of English, Princeton

Anne Anlin Cheng is Professor of English and the Associate Chair in the Department of English and a core faculty in the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University. She specializes in race studies and psychoanalytic theory and works in twentieth-century American literature, with special focus on Asian American and African American literatures. She is the author of The Melancholy of Race: Assimilation, Psychoanalysis, and Hidden Grief (Oxford University Press), which explores the notion of racial grief at the intersection of culture, history, and law.

Sarah ChinnVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of English, Hunter College, CUNY

Sarah Chinn teaches nineteenth century literature at Hunter College, CUNY.  Her work primarily explores questions of race, embodiment,  sexuality, and gender in U.S. literature and culture, particularly in the 19th century. She is the author of Technology and the Logic of American Racism: A Cultural History of the Body as Evidence (Continuum, 2000) and The Invention of Modern Adolescence: Children of Immigrants in Turn-of-the-Century America (Rutgers University Press, 2008).

Professor of English and Africana Studies

Yvette Christiansë is a South African-born poet, novelist, and scholar. She is the author of two books of poetry: Imprendehora (published in South Africa by Kwela Books/Snail Press 2009) and Castaway (Duke University Press, 1999).Imprendehora was a finalist for the Via Afrika Herman Charles Bosman Prize in 2010 and Castaway was a finalist in the 2001 PEN International Poetry Prize.

Laura CiolkowskiExecutive Committee
Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference and Adjunct Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Laura Ciolkowski is Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Social Difference and Adjunct Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature. She is also Associate Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Columbia.
Director of the Oral History Research Office

Mary Marshall Clark is director of the Columbia Center for Oral History, the world’s oldest university-based oral history public archive. Clark, along with the sociologist Peter Bearman, undertook a large, longitudinal oral history project, “The September 11, 2001 Oral History Narrative and Memory Project,” a collection of 600 interviews with culturally and ethnically diverse New Yorkers differently affected by the afterlife of the September 11th events.

Katherine Cohn
Katherine CohnGraduate Student

Katherine Cohn is a Master's student in Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University in the MODA Program. 

Sarah ColeFaculty
Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Department Chair

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley (1997); B.A., Williams College (1989). Sarah Cole specializes in British literature of the 19th and 20th centuries, with an emphasis on the modernist period. Areas of interest include war; violence, sexuality and the body; history and memory; imperialism; and Irish literature of the modernist period.

Beth ColemanVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Writing and New Media, MIT

Beth Coleman is Assistant Professor of Writing and New Media in the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies and Comparative Media Studies. She is faculty director of the C3 game culture and mobile media initiative. Her fields of research interest include new media, contemporary aesthetics, electronic music, critical theory and literature, and race theory. Under the name M. Singe, she co-founded the SoundLab Cultural Alchemy project, established in 1995.

César Colón-Montijo Graduate Student
Graduate Student, Music, Columbia University

César Colón-Montijo is a journalist and doctoral candidate in ethnomusicology at Columbia University. He obtained a Master's in anthropology and audiovisual communication from the University of Barcelona, Spain in 2005, and previously completed a B. A. in communications at the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras Campus in 2003. César is the editor of the Cocinando Suave: Ensayos de Salsa en Puerto Rico (2015), a landmark collection of scholarly, historical, and journalistic essays, poems, and photo-essays about the histories of salsa.

David J. ConnorVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor, School of Education, Hunter College, CUNY

David J. Connor is an Associate Professor in the School of Education of Hunter College, CUNY. He is the author of three books and numerous articles on disability and education. David's areas of interest include teacher education, learning disabilities, inclusive education, and social justice issues. For the last decade he has contributed to the development of the growing field of Disability Studies in Education.

Hector Cordero-GuzmánVisiting Faculty
Professor, Department of Sociology, Baruch College
Instructor, Department of History, Florida International University

Dr. Cornelius's research examines the development of “racial science” during the nineteenth century. Her book manuscript titled /'More Approximate to the Animal:' African American Men and Women’s Resistance to the Rise of Scientific Racism in Mid-Nineteenth Century America/ provides a gendered analysis of the ways in which African Americans - enslaved and free, lettered and illiterate - addressed scientific theories of racial differences.

G. Thomas CouserVisiting Faculty
Professor Emeritus of English and Founding Director, Disability Studies Program, Hofstra University

G. Thomas Couser retired in 2011 from Hofstra University, where he was a professor of English and founding director of the Disability Studies Program.

Christina CrosbyVisiting Faculty
Professor of English and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Wesleyan University

Christina Crosby has worked at Wesleyan University since 1982, where she is Professor of English and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Her subfields are Victorian studies and Feminist Studies.  She has published The Ends of History: Victorians and the 'Woman Question' and essays and reviews in Victorian Studies, PMLA, College English, and elsewhere.

Andrea CrowGraduate Student
PhD Student

Andrea Crow is a PhD student at Columbia in the department of English and Comparative literature. Her research focuses on seventeenth-century literature and food politics as well as on academic labor and the future of the university. Her work has been published in Early Modern Women and Shakespeare Quarterly, and she has been the recipient of a grant-in-aid from the Folger Shakespeare Library to pursue her research. Andrea received a B.A. in English with a minor in Latin from Gonzaga University and an M.A.

Arnaldo Cruz-MalavéVisiting Faculty
Professor, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, Fordham University
Rubén Cruz-MalavéVisiting Faculty
Director, Creative Writing Program, Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, New York University
Nijah CunninghamGraduate Student
Doctoral candidate, Department of English and Comparative Literature

Nijah Cunningham is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and the editorial assistant for Small Axe. He is currently working on a dissertation that focuses on the interplay between literature, performance, and the question of a black aesthetic that emerges out of the 1960s moment and across three African diasporic nodes in Senegal, Jamaica, and the United States.

Patricia DaileyExecutive Committee
Director, Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, Columbia University

The current Director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality (IRWGS), Patricia Dailey is a co-founder of the Junior Faculty Advisory Board, the ASSC, and the University Seminar on Affect Studies.

Anna Danziger HalperinGraduate Student
PhD Student, History

Anna Danziger Halperin studies twentieth century American and British social policy and its effects on women and children, with a particular interest in child care. She graduated from Barnard College in 2006 with a degree in History and Human Rights. Before returning to Columbia in 2010, Anna conducted research and coauthored several reports on U.S. child care policies and other related issues affecting low-wage working families during her employment with the Urban Institute and the Institute for Women's Policy Research.

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Faculty, Program in Narrative Medicine, Columbia University; Faculty, Health Advocacy Graduate Program and Fiction Writing Program, Sarah Lawrence College

Sayantani DasGupta, MD MPH Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Faculty, Master's Program in Narrative Medicine, Columbia University. Faculty, Health Advocacy Graduate Program and Fiction Writing Program, Sarah Lawrence College.

Lennard DavisVisiting Faculty
Distinguished Professor of English; Professor of Disability and Human Development, School of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago; Professor of Medical Education, University of Illinois College of Medicine

Lennard J. Davis is Professor in the English Department in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he had also served as Head.  In addition, he is Professor of Disability and Human Development in the School of Applied Health Sciences of the University of Illinois at Chicago, as well as Professor of Medical Education in the College of Medicine.  He is also director of Project Biocultures a think-tank devoted to issues around the intersection of culture, medicine, disability, biotechnology, and the biosphere.

Lindsey DaytonGraduate Student
PhD Student, History

Lindsey Dayton is a second-year PhD student in the field of U.S. History, focusing on African American, gender, and labor history in the 20th century. She received a BA in liberal arts and an MA in women’s history from Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, NY. Her MA thesis, “From Heavy Iron Blues to I Pay my Union Dues,” explored black women laundry workers’ successful efforts to organize a union in New York City during the Great Depression.

Doctoral Candidate, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

Carina del Valle Schorske is a poet, translator, and second-year PhD student in Comparative Literature. She is broadly interested in the history of psychoanalysis and other forms of psychic inquiry among artists and intellectuals of color in the Americas (Harlem, Mexico City, the Caribbean). She is currently at work on a project about Pamela Colman Smith, a turn-of-the-century Jamaican folklorist and the illustrator of the world's most widely used tarot deck.

Artist

The artist is the granddaughter of Armenian immigrants to Argentina and was born in Buenos Aires in 1967. Since 1988 she has lived in Berlin. Her artistic work deals with issues related to the burden of national identity, memory, the role of minorities in the society and the potential of a space "in between". Her work uses a very heterogeneous language (installation, video, sound installation, rugs).

Professor of French and Philosophy

Souleymane Bachir Diagne specializes in history of philosophy, Islamic philosophy, African philosophy and literature, and received his academic training in France. An alumnus of the École Normale Supérieure, he holds an agrégation in Philosophy (1978) and he took his Doctorat d’État in philosophy at the Sorbonne (1988) where he also took his BA (1977). Before joining Columbia University in 2008 he taught philosophy for many years at Cheikh Anta Diop University, Dakar (Senegal) and at Northwestern University.

Matthew DiasGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Bioethics, Columbia University

Matthew Dias is a researcher at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and graduate student in Columbia’s bioethics program. Matt’s scholarship focuses on clinical research ethics and advances in medicine that intersect law and public policy. He is actively involved in various healthcare innovation and precision medicine initiatives in New York City and beyond. To this end, Matt looks forward to sharing his distinct perspectives and insights with the Precision Medicine Project and its affiliates. 

Director, Institute for African Studies, Columbia University
Mamadou Diouf is the Leitner Family Professor of African Studies and the Director of Columbia University's Institute for African Studies.
Elizabeth J. DonaldsonVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of English, New York Institute of Technology

Elizabeth J. Donaldson is Associate Professor of English at New York Institute of Technology, where she teaches courses in American literature, writing, and medical humanities. She has published essays on mental illness in film, antipsychiatry in Lauren Slater’s memoirs, physiognomy and madness in Jane Eyre, teaching Melville online, and the poetry of Amy Lowell, among other subjects.  She is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Literary and Cultural Disabilities Studies and is co-editor (with Catherine J.

Elsa DorlinVisiting Faculty
Professor of Political and Social Philosophy, Vincennes/St. Denis Paris 8 University (France)

Elsa Dorlin is Professor of political and social philosophy at the department of political science and involved in the department of women’s studies and gender and sexuality studies at Vincennes/St. Denis Paris 8 University (France). Dorlin specializes in feminist philosophy and theory and historical epistemology of sexuality. Dorlin’s research also focuses on critical theory and postcolonial studies.

Samar DudinVisiting Faculty
Regional Director and Head of Programs, Ruwwad Al Tanmeya
Samar Dudin is the Regional Director and Head of Programs for Ruwwad Al Tanmeya, a not for profit community & youth empowerment organization. She develops creative community and youth educational experiences and organizes community led campaigns which focus on social change through grass roots leadership development. Samar is an independent theatre director and educator since 1993. In 2006 she founded Takween Open Spaces for Enlightenment & Creativity initiative in Amman, Jordan which focuses on creating experiential learning contexts to engage youth and children in exploring pluralism and diversity as the means and meaning for a better world. She has been a fellow of the Leadership program of the International Women's Forum (IWF) since 2003. She was selected as an Ashoka Fellow for her Takween citizenship initiative on Youth Identity & Cultural diversity in Amman in 2009, An Aspen Leadership fellow and moderator since 2010. She sits on the Advisory Committee for the Arab Education Forum, a founding board member of Al Ballad Theatre, a founding member of Mujtama3i for Arab Community organizers and a committed volunteer trainer on women's leadership with IWF–Jordan's chapter since 2005. She is a graduate of Santa Clara University in California and holds a Bachelor degree in theatre arts.
Sarah DuggerGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Genetics and Development, Columbia University

Sarah Dugger is a PhD student in the Department of Genetics & Development, who is working in the laboratory of Dr. David Goldstein in the Institute for Genomic Medicine.  Sarah is originally from Akron, Ohio and obtained her undergraduate degree in Biology and a Masters degree in Genetic Counseling from Case Western Reserve University. She was a practicing full time prenatal genetic counselor for four years at Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton, Ohio—an experience that sparked her interest in precision medicine research.

Natanya DuncanVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of History and Geography, Morgan State University

Dr. Natanya Duncan received her PhD from the University of Florida in 2009. Her areas of research include a focus on the development of Black Nationalist practices prevalent amongst female members of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and subsequent derivative groups which she has termed as an “Efficient Womanhood.” Using this framework, which she asserts refers to the “blending of nationalist and gendered concerns without the sacrificing of one for the other amongst African American women during the long freedom struggle,” Dr.

Madhusree DuttaVisiting Faculty

Madhusree is a filmmaker; also a curator, pedagogue, researcher, producer and activist. Though visual culture is the key to her works, multi-disciplinary initiatives and multi-layered representations frame her myriad engagements. Filmmaking, theatre, visual arts, literature, media products; students’ movement, feminist movement, movement against communalism, movement for democratisation of art practices; cultural literacy, art pedagogy, interfaces between genres, movements and disciplines form the path of Madhusree’s personal journey.

Matias EchanoveVisiting Faculty

Having worked on their obsessions in parallel worlds for several years, Matias Echanove and Rahul Srivastava joined forces through their blog airoots/eirut in 2006. They have since written extensively on urban themes and engaged in projects involving planning, pedagogy, technology and activism. They are the co-directors of the Institute of Urbanology, which has offices in Mumbai and Goa (India).

Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Professor Edwards is the author of The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Harvard UP, 2003), which was awarded the John Hope Franklin Prize of the American Studies Association, the Gilbert Chinard prize of the Society for French Historical Studies, and runner-up for the James Russell Lowell Prize of the Modern Language Association. With Robert G. O'Meally and Farah Jasmine Griffin, he co-edited the collection Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies (Columbia UP, 2004).
Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University
Brent Hayes Edwards is a Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He is the author of The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Harvard, 2003), which was awarded the John Hope Franklin Prize of the American Studies Association, the Gilbert Chinard Prize of the Society for French Historical Studies, and was runner-up for the James Russell Lowell Prize of the Modern Language Association. With Robert G.
Bikem EkberzadeVisiting Faculty

Bikem Ekberzade is a photojournalist who focuses on forced migration in forgotten conflicts. She started her career as a videographer in United States, and soon continued her profession as a photojournalist in the U.S. and worldwide. She has worked for numerous international news outlets such as CNN International, Newsweek, Businessweek, Der Spiegel and The Christian Monitor.

Meriem El HaitamiVisiting Faculty
Fulbright Research Scholar 2012-2013, SUNY Binghamton

Meriem El Haitami is a doctoral student at the University of Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah in Fez, Morocco. She conducts research in affiliation with the Moroccan Cultural Studies Centre in the English department. She is currently a Fulbright research scholar at SUNY Binghamton. Her PhD research addresses the dynamics of female religious authority and activism in contemporary Morocco.

Julie Passanante ElmanVisiting Faculty
Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, NYU

Julie Passanante Elman is a Visiting Assistant Professor in New York University's Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies within the interdisciplinary Department of Social and Cultural Analysis. While at NYU, Elman has developed the university's first-ever undergraduate course in disability studies and served as a member of the NYU Council for the Study of Disability. Elman received her Ph.D. in American Studies from The George Washington University in 2009. Her research focuses broadly on 20th century media and cultural history, American literature, queer theory and disability studies.

Hoda ElsaddaVisiting Faculty
Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Faculty of Arts, Cairo University
Dr. Elsadda is a leading scholar of women’s rights in Egypt and the Arab World, and a professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cairo University. With degrees from both Cairo University and the American University, she taught Comparative Arabic Studies at the University of Manchester from 2005 to 2011. In the past, she fought for changes in the country’s marriage laws and was member of the 50- committee for drafting the constitution in 2013. She is currently Chair of the Board of the Women and Memory Forum and Vice-President of the Egyptian Social Democratic Party.
Professor of Law

Elizabeth F. Emens is a Professor of Law at Columbia.  She teaches and researches in the areas of employment discrimination law, disability law, contracts, and law and sexuality.  She earned her BA and JD from Yale and her Ph.D. in English from King’s College, Cambridge.

Assistant Professor, Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Stemcell Transplantation, Columbia University Medical Center

Dr. Katie Ender is a pediatric hematologist and assistant professor in the Division of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, and Stem Cell Transplantation at Columbia University Medical Center.   Her primary clinical expertise and research experience have focused on sickle cell disease.  She has a Master’s of Science in Clinical Investigation from Northwestern University and is currently pursuing a Master’s of Science in Bioethics at Columbia University.  Dr.

Silver Professor of Anthropology, New York University
Sally Engle Merry is Silver Professor of Anthropology at New York University. She is also a Faculty Director of the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice at the New York University School of Law, and past president of the American Ethnological Society.
Pınar EnsariVisiting Faculty

Pınar Ensari did her undergraduate study at Boğaziçi University and graduated from departments of Philosophy and Political Science and International Relations (double major program) in 2010.  She finished her graduate study in the Cultural Studies MA program at Sabancı University in 2012 with a thesis titled “At the Crossroads of Eduation and Politics: Kurdish Women Studens in İstanbul”. Currently, she is working as a teaching assistant at Sabancı University, while also pursuing my studies in research areas such as ethnicity, gender, urban studies and anthropology of youth.

Professor, School of International and Public Affairs

Yasmine Ergas is Director of the Specialization on Gender and Public Policy, Lecturer in International and Public Affairs, and Associate Director of the Institute for the Study of Human Rights. A lawyer and sociologist, she has worked on issues regarding gender and women’s rights as a policy analyst and advisor, scholar and advocate.

Basak ErturGraduate Student
Birbeck Law, UK

Basak Ertur is a PhD candidate and sessional lecturer at the School of Law, Birkbeck College. Her current research focuses on political trials, performativity, spectrality and sovereignty. She is the editor of Manual for Conspiracy (Sharjah Art Foundation, 2011) and co-editor of Waiting for Barbarians: A Tribute to Edward Said (Verso, 2008).

Yasmine EspertGraduate Student
Doctoral Candidate, Department of Art History and Archaeology

Yasmine Espert is an Art History doctoral candidate at Columbia University. Her research interests include the cinematic medium, the Caribbean, and diaspora. She is the Graduate Fellow for the Digital Black Atlantic Project, a working group supported by the Center for the Study of Social Difference at Columbia University. Yasmine is also an alumna of the Fulbright U.S. Student program.

Director, Institute For Religion, Culture, & Public Life

Katherine Pratt Ewing, Professor of Religion, is also Coordinator of the Master of Arts Program in the South Asia Institute. Until 2010, she was Professor of Cultural Anthropology and Religion at Duke University, where she served as the Executive Director of the North Carolina Consortium for South Asian Studies. In 2010-2011 she was Professor of Anthropology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison before moving to Columbia’s Religion Department in 2011.

Professor of Religion

Katherine Pratt Ewing is Professor of Religion and Director of the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life at Columbia University. She has carried out ethnographic fieldwork in Pakistan, Turkey, and India, and among Muslims in Europe and the United States.  Her research has focused on debates among Muslims about the proper practice of Islam in the modern world, the place of Muslims within the German national imaginary, and sexualities, gender, and the body in South Asia.

Nadia FadilVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor, Interculturalism, Migration and Minorities Research Center, KULeuven

Nadia Fadil studied sociology and anthropology and works as an Assistant Professor at the Interculturalism, Migration and Minorities Research Center at KULeuven. Her research interests are situated at the intersection of religion, subjectivity, secular and liberal governmentality and multiculturalism, with Islam in Europe as specific empirical focus. A first thread of her work investigates the question of subjectivity, in which she looks at the ethical self-cultivation of pious and secular Muslims in Belgium.

Soledad Falabella LucoVisiting Faculty
Director, ESE:O
Professor Soledad Falabella Luco is the director of ESE:O, a non-profit organization which promotes performative writing projects, and the teaching and practice of writing to empower learning communities with effective skills for local and global participation in knowledge production and circulation. She teaches feminist critical theory, performance and poetry at the Magíster en Género y Cultura, Universidad de Chile.
Seth FeinVisiting Faculty

Seth Fein's work studies international and transnational histories, much of it focused on  audiovisual culture in the Americas.  It has moved from the page to the screen.  In 2014-2015 he is a Fellow in Multimedia History at Harvard's Charles Warren Center, where he will develop Our Neighborhood, a documentary that examines Washington's intervention in Latin American television as cultural counterinsurgency against the Cuban Revolution across the 1960s; he has published an e

Gisele FeldmanVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Music, Columbia University
Kevin Fellezs is an Assistant Professor of Music at Columbia University, where he shares a joint appointment in the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. His book titled Birds of Fire: Jazz, Rock, Funk and the Creation of Fusion (Duke University Press) is a study of fusion (jazz-rock-funk) music of the 1970s, which won the 2012 Woody Guthrie Book Award.
Susanna FergusonGraduate Student

Susanna Ferguson is a PhD Student in the History Department at Columbia University, where she focuses on the history of the modern Middle East, particularly on questions of women and gender. She is also a certificate candidate at Columbia's Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality (IRWAGS). Prior to beginning her doctoral work at Columbia, Susanna graduated magna cum laude from Yale University with a BA in History and received a Master's degree from NYU's Hagop Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies.

Corinne FieldVisiting Faculty
Lecturer, Corcoran Department of History and Women, Gender, Sexuality Program, University of Virginia
Cori Field has been an adjunct faculty member in the Department of History and the Program in Women, Gender, and Sexuality at the University of Virginia since 2007. Her research focuses on the intersection of gender, race, and age in the nineteenth-century United States. She is currently co-editing a volume on the historical significance of chronological age for New York University Press.
Licia Fiol-MattaVisiting Faculty
Visiting Professor, Spanish and Portuguese, New York University

Licia Fiol-Matta is Visiting Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at New York University. She received an AB from Princeton University and a PhD from Yale University, both in Comparative Literature. She is the author of A Queer Mother for the Nation: The State and Gabriela Mistral (Minnesota) and The Great Woman Singer: Gender and Voice in Puerto Rican Music (Duke). Fiol-Matta is co-editor of the series New Directions in Latino American Cultures (Palgrave).

Sibylle FischerVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, Comparative Literature, NYU
Sibylle Fischer (Ph.D. Columbia) is Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, Comparative Literature, NYU. Her work is situated at the intersections between literature, history, political philosophy, and aesthetics. She is the author of "Modernity Disavowed: Haiti and the Cultures of Slavery in the Age of Revolution" (Duke UP, 2004) and the editor of a new translation of "Cecilia Valdés" (Oxford UP, 2004). She has written numerous articles on Caribbean, Brazilian, and Spanish American literature from the colonial period to the 20th century.
Melissa FisherVisiting Faculty
Visiting Assistant Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University

Melissa Fisher earned her Ph.D. and M.A. in cultural anthropology at Columbia University, and her B.A. at Barnard College. She has received numerous grants and fellowships, including awards from the Alfred Sloan Foundation, the Institute for Advanced Study at Lancaster University, and the Center for Organizational Research at Stockholm University.

Frances Fox PivenVisiting Faculty
Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the CUNY Graduate Center

 Before coming to the Graduate Center, Prof. Piven taught at Boston University, Columbia University, New York University Law School, the Institute of Advanced Studies in Vienna, the University of Amsterdam, and the University of Bologna. She is past Vice-President of the American Political Science Association,  has served as program co-chair of the annual political science meetings, and is a past president of the Society for the Study of Social Problems.  She is currently President of the American Sociological Association.

Professor of Law and Director, Center for the Study of Law and Culture, Columbia Law School

Since joining Columbia Law School's faculty in 2001 Professor Franke's research and teaching have increasingly focused on gender and racial equality and well as the regulation of sexuality in domestic, transnational and international contexts. In Sexual Tensions of Post Empire Professor Franke examined two contemporary cites - Cairo and Zimbabwe - in which state efforts to eradicate the traces of empire and to resurrect an authentic post-colonial nation have produced sexual subjects that serve as a kind of existential residue and remainder of a demonized colonial past and absence. 

Zeynep GambettiVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor, Political Science & International Relations, Boğaziçi University

Zeynep Gambetti is Associate Professor of political theory at Boğazici University. She obtained her Ph. D. at the University of Paris VII in 1999. Her work focuses on collective agency, ethics, and public space. She has carried out extensive research on the transformation of the conflict between the Turkish state and the Kurdish movement, with particular emphasis on space as a vector of relationality.

Rebecca GardenVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor, Center for Bioethics and Humanities, Upstate Medical University

Rebecca Garden, PhD, is Associate Professor in the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, NY.  She received her doctorate from Columbia University’s Department of English and Comparative Literature. She has published on empathy, the humanities, and medicine in New Literary History and the Journal for General Internal Medicine and on narrative, Deafness, and disability in Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, the Journal of Medical Humanities, Medical Humanities, and the Journal of Clinical Ethics.

Mitchell I. Ginsberg Professor of Contemporary Urban Problems, Columbia School of Social Work

Irwin Garfinkel is the co-founding director of the Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC). Of the 37 population research centers funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), CPRC is the only one to have been founded within a school of social work. Its signature area is children, youth, and families.

Nicole GervasioGraduate Student

Nicole Gervasio is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Her dissertation is on the ethics of representing mass political violence in contemporary postcolonial literature. Her work focuses on intersections between queer, postcolonial, and feminist theory in relation to themes of survival, embodiment, and trauma in literatures of the Global South. She also has a B.A. in English and Growth & Structure of Cities from Bryn Mawr College and has been the recipient of Mellon Mays, Beinecke, and Javits Fellowships.

Hala GhoshehVisiting Faculty

Hala Ghosheh is a gender expert and development consultant, who was the Director of the five year Gender Social Fund in Jordan. She specializes in sustainable development work with focus on women and youth. Her experience includes working on policy, institutional and local community levels in several countries in the region. She has worked on program management, design, development and monitoring and evaluation, organizational gender reviews and conducting qualitative research to assess the status of women and youth in different contexts.

Wanjiru GichuhiVisiting Faculty
Senior Lecturer, Population and Research Institute, University of Nairobi
Wanjiru Gichuhi is a Senior Lecturer at the Population Studies and Research Institute of the University of Nairobi. A social demographer, her research focuses on population, health, rural/community and gender issues that have development and social policy implications. Specific interests include family dynamics, maternal/child survival, reproductive health, FP/HIV/AIDS, livelihood and food security issues.
Alex GilFaculty
Digital Scholarship Coordinator for the Humanities and History Division, Columbia University Library

Alex Gil is Digital Scholarship Coordinator for the Humanities and History Division at Columbia University Library, Affiliate Faculty of the English and Comparative Literature Department, and one of the founders of the Studio@Butler, a technology atelier for faculty, students and librarians. He has published in journals across the Atlantic and the Americas, while sustaining an open and robust online research presence on the subject of digital humanities, textual scholarship, and Caribbean Studies. In 2010-2012 he was a fellow at the Scholars' Lab and NINES at the University of Virginia.

Eileen GilloolyExecutive Committee
Executive Director, Heyman Center for the Humanities and Society of Fellows; Adjunct Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and the Institute for Research on Women and Gender

Eileen Gillooly is Executive Director of the Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities and Adjunct Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Gillooly has a BA from Scripps College and a PhD from Columbia University. Her interests include nineteenth-century literature and culture in Britain and its colonies, gender studies, public humanities, justice studies, medical and health humanities, and literary and social theory.

Faye GinsburgVisiting Faculty
David B. Kriser Professor of Anthropology, NYU

Faye Ginsburg is David B. Kriser Professor of Anthropology at NYU where is is also Director of the Center for Media, Culture and History, Co-Director of the NYU Council for the Study of Disability, and Co-Director of the Center for Religion and Media. Prizewinning author/editor of four Her research focuses on movements for social transformation, from her early work on abortion activists, to her longstanding research on indigenous media, to her current work, with Rayna Rapp, on cultural innovation and learning disabilities.

Associate Professor of French and Africana Studies

Kaiama L. Glover is Associate Professor of French and Africana Studies at Barnard College.

Marcial Godoy-AnativiaVisiting Faculty
Associate Director, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, New York University

Marcial Godoy-Anativia is a sociocultural anthropologist and the Associate Director of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics at New York University. He is co-editor, with Zeynep Gambetti, of Rhetorics of Insecurity: Belonging and Violence in the Neoliberal Era (NYU Press, forthcoming 2013). He is also Editor, with Jill Lane, of e-misférica, the Institute's trilingual online journal. From 2000-2007, he worked in the Program on Latin America and the Caribbean and the Program on International Collaboration at the Social Science Research Council.

Ximena GoeckeVisiting Faculty
Universidad de Chile

Ximena Vanessa Goecke S. is a chilean-jewish historian and a teacher of History and English, candidate to the degree of Magister in Gender and Culture in the Faculty of Humanities at Universidad de Chile. She teaches some courses in the Faculty of Education at Universidad de las Américas (UDLA) and in the English as Foreign Language area at Universidad Católica.

She participates in the research nucleus in “Body and Emotion” of the Faculty of Social Sciences at Universidad de Chile, as a member of the research section in “Body, memory and violence”.

Nilüfer GöleVisiting Faculty
Professor of Sociology, L'École des Hautes études en Sciences Sociales, Paris

Nilüfer Göle is Professor of Sociology at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris. She works on Islamic visibility in European public spaces and the debates it engenders on religious and cultural difference. Her sociological approach aims to open up a new reading of modernity from a non-western perspective and a broader critique of Eurocentrism in the definitions of secular modernity. She is the author of Islam in Europe: The Lure of Fundamentalism and the Allure of Cosmopolitanism (2010) and The Forbidden Modern: Civilization and Veiling (1997).

PhD Student, History

Marianne González Le Saux is a second year student in the History doctoral program, and her research is centered on the cultural and social history of the law in Latin America. She is a lawyer from the University of Chile. She has been awarded the Fulbright Scholarship, and she is funded by CONICYT, Chile, and Columbia's Richard Hofstadter Fellowship. 

Meena GopalVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor, Tata Institute of Social Sciences
Meena Gopal works at the Centre for Women's Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, in Mumbai, India and is also a member of the autonomous feminist collective, Forum Against Oppression of Women, Bombay.
Stathis GourgourisExecutive Committee
Professor of Classics, English, and Comparative Literature, Columbia University
Stathis Gourgouris is a Professor of Classics, English, and Comparative Literature, Columbia University and former Director of the Comparative Institute for Literature and Society. Professor Gourgouris writes and teaches on a variety of subjects that ultimately come together around questions of the poetics and politics of modernity and democracy. He is the author of Dream Nation: Enlightenment, Colonization, and the Institution of Modern Greece (Stanford, 1996); Does Literature Think?
Milena GrassVisiting Faculty

Milena Grass Kleiner, translator and theater scholar, is a professor at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. She holds a master's degree in Latin American Studies from Universidad de Chile and a PhD in Literature from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. She has published Spanish translations of English, American, and French plays, as well as books on Chilean history and theater studies. Her main fields of research have been theater and ritual, history, and memory in post-conflict contexts.

Judith GreenbergVisiting Faculty
New York University

Judith Greenberg's research and teaching interests focus on questions of memory and trauma Studies, especially through a feminist lens. She holds a degree in comparative literature and her courses are informed by psychoanalysis, film Studies, Holocaust Studies, and her years teaching in French departments.

Alyssa GreeneGraduate Student

Alyssa Greene is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Germanic Languages and the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University. She studies twentieth-century German and Austrian literature, with a particular emphasis on the post-Second World War era. Her research interests include memory discourses in the postwar period; migration (especially in the German-Turkish context); feminist and postcolonial criticism; the figure of the child and depictions of childhood in Cold War and post-Cold War narratives of authoritarian states.

Professor of History, Cornell University

My research interests focus on West Africa and more specifically the social and cultural history of Ghana from the height of the Atlantic slave trade (in the 18th century) through the early colonial period (up to World War Two).  Of particular interest to me are changes in gender and ethnic relations, African belief systems and the history of slavery.

The courses I teach reflect these research interests as well as my fascination with Africa's encounter with other worlds (the Americas, Europe, the Islamic world, the Indian Ocean world). 

Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons
Ellen Greenebaum is Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Cell Biology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. She is a Clinical team member studying people who were children (in utero to 18 years old) at time of Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident April 26, 1986 to determine effect on thyroid.
Department of Africana and Puerto Rican/Latino Studies, Hunter College

Professor Gregg’s scholarly interests include Anglophone Caribbean literature, Caribbean women’s writing, Caribbean intellectual traditions, African American literature, and literature of the African Diaspora. Her publications include Jean Rhys’s Historical Imagination (1995) and Caribbean Women: An Anthology of Non-Fiction Writing (2005). 

Her forthcoming book is "This Past that Waits for Me.”  Anglophone Caribbean Women Writers and the Challenge of History.

Zareena GrewalVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of American Studies and Religious Studies, Yale University

Zareena Grewal is a historical anthropologist and a documentary filmmaker whose research focuses on race, gender, religion, nationalism, and transnationalism across a wide spectrum of American Muslim communities. Her first book, Islam is a Foreign Country: American Muslims and the Global Crisis of Authority (NYU 2013), is an ethnography of transnational Muslim networks that link US mosques to Islamic movements in Syria, Jordan, and Egypt through debates about the reform of Islam.

William B. Ransford Professor of English & Comparative Literature and African-American Studies

B.A., Harvard (1985); Ph.D.,Yale (1992). Professor Griffin's major fields of interest are American and African American literature, music, history and politics. The recipient of numerous honors and awards for her teaching and scholarship, in 2006-2007 Professor Griffin was a fellow at the New York Public Library Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.

Emily GroopmanGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Emily Groopman is a third year MD/PhD student at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. She was born and raised in Brookline, MA, and graduated magna cum laude with Highest Honors in Human Evolutionary Biology from Harvard College. Her PhD research, in the lab of Dr. Ali Gharavi, applies genomic methods to discover variants predisposing individuals to different forms of chronic kidney disease, in order to deliver personalized diagnoses and treatment. Her interests include bioethics, medical humanism, and integrating cultural differences into the delivery of care. 

Atina GrossmanVisiting Faculty
Professor of History, Cooper Union

Atina Grossmann teaches Modern German and European History, and Gender Studies. A graduate of the City College of New York (BA) and Rutgers University (Ph.D), she has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, German Marshall Fund, American Council of Learned Societies, the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and the American Academy in Berlin.

Nacira Guénif-SouilamasVisiting Faculty
Professor, University of Paris 8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis, Education Sciences Department

Nacira Guénif-Souilamas is Professor, University of Paris 8 Vincennes-Saint-Denis, Education Sciences Department.

She was formerly Associate Professor at the University of Paris Nord/13 and Co-Director of EXPERICE Research Center. 

Guénif-Souilamas holds a Phd in Sociology from l’École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris and a HDR of Sciences Po Paris. 

Jenny GumerGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Bioethics, Columbia University
Jenny Gumer is an attorney practicing in the litigation department of Gibson Dunn and Crutcher, Los Angeles. As a member of the firm's FDA, Healthcare and Life Sciences practices groups, she advises pharmaceutical and medical device companies on regulatory compliance as well as represents them in large scale litigations.  Jenny is also a student in Columbia University's Masters in Bioethics program which she will complete in Spring 2017.
Associate Professor of Political Science, Barnard College and Columbia University

Ayten Gündoğdu is Associate Professor of Political Science at Barnard College-Columbia University. Her research draws on the resources of modern and contemporary political theory for the purposes of addressing problems related to human rights, migration, citizenship, and sovereignty. She has recently published Rightlessness in an Age of Rights: Hannah Arendt and the Contemporary Struggles of Migrants (Oxford University Press, 2015; ISA Theory Honorable Mention).

Havva Guney-RuebenackerVisiting Faculty

Dr. Havva G. Guney-Ruebenacker is a visiting post-doc researcher at Harvard Law School. Her dissertation is titled “An Islamic Legal Realist Critique of the Traditional Theory of Slavery, Marriage and Divorce in Islamic Law” and it focuses on traditional Islamic law and modern Islamic legal reforms in the area of slavery and family law with a comparative examination of modernization of American family law in the area of no-fault divorce and its economic consequences.

Jack HalberstamExecutive Committee

Halberstam works in the areas of popular, visual and queer culture with an emphasis on subcultures. Halberstam’s first book, Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters (1995), was a study of popular gothic cultures of the 19th and 20th centuries and it stretched from Frankenstein to contemporary horror film. Her 1998 book, Female Masculinity (1998), made a ground breaking argument about non-male masculinity and tracked the impact of female masculinity upon hegemonic genders.

Kim HallFaculty
Lucyle Hook Chair, Professor of English and Africana Studies

Kim F. Hall joined the Barnard faculty in 2006.  Previously, she held the Thomas F.X. Mullarkey Chair of Literature at Fordham University.  She has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Swarthmore College, and Georgetown University.

Professor Hall's research and scholarship have been supported by the Folger Institute, the ACLS, and the Ford Foundation.  She has also received an NEH/Newberry Fellowship.

She is listed in Who's Who of American Women as well as Who's Who Among African Americans.

Royall Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Janet Halley is the Royall Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. She has a Ph.D. in English Literature from UCLA and a J.D. from Yale Law School. She has taught at Tel Aviv Buckmann School of Law and in the Law Department of the American University in Cairo. She is the author of Split Decisions: How and Why to Take a Break from Feminism (Princeton 2006), and Don’t: A Reader’s Guide to the Military’s Anti-Gay Policy (Duke 1999). With Wendy Brown, she coedited Left Legalism/Left Critique (Duke 2002), and with Andrew Parker she coedited After Sex?

Rema HammamiVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of Anthropology, Birzeit University
Rema Hammami is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the Institute of Women’s Studies, Birzeit University where she founded the graduate program in Gender and Development in 1998, the first graduate program in gender studies in the region.
Nabila HamzaVisiting Faculty
President, Foundation for the Future

Mrs. Nabila Hamza is the President of the Foundation for the Future, (FFF) an independent, international nonprofit organization  supporting the civil society initiatives in their efforts to promote democracy and human rights in the MENA region. Prior to her work at the Foundation for the Future, Mrs. Hamza served as the Executive Director of the Center of Arab Women for Training and Research (CAWTAR). She has worked as an Expert in the Arab League for 10 years, in addition to having fulfilled numerous consulting missions in the region.

Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science, and Director, Columbia Center for Contemporary Critical Thought

Bernard E. Harcourt joined the Columbia University faculty in July 2014. His scholarship intersects social and political theory, the sociology of punishment, and penal law and procedure.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Women's and Gender Studies

Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Women's and Gender Studies. B. A., Wesleyan University (1984); Ph.D., Yale University (1992). Professor Hartman's major fields of interest are African American and American literature and cultural history, slavery, law and literature, and performance studies. She is on the editorial board of Callaloo. She has been a Fulbright, Rockefeller, Whitney Oates, and University of California President's Fellow.

Mona HassanVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies and History, Duke University

Mona Hassan is Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies and History at Duke University and obtained her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2009.  She specializes in global and comparative Islamic history, focusing on the intersections of culture, religion, politics, and gender.

Frances S. HassoVisiting Faculty
Director, International Comparative Studies Program and Associate Professor in Women's Studies and Sociology, Duke University
Frances S. Hasso is Director of International Comparative Studies and Associate Professor in Women's Studies at Duke. She holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Sociology. She joined the Duke faculty in 2010 after 10 years as a faculty member at Oberlin College. Her recent monograph is titled, Consuming Desires: Family Crisis and the State in the Middle East (Stanford University Press, 2011). She is co-editing with Zakia Salime (Rutgers) a book project titled, "Geographies of Gender in the Arab Revolutions."
Mariana HausdorfVisiting Faculty
Actress, Historian, Teacher, Postgraduate Student PhD in Latin American Studies, Universidad de Chile

Mariana Hausdorf Andrade holds a Licenciate in Acting, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile 2011; Licenciate in History, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 2012; and a qualification in secondary education teaching specializing in History, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 2012.

Professor of Art History

Anne Higonnet teaches and writes about nineteenth century art, childhood, and collecting. A Harvard College B.A, she received her PhD from Yale University in 1988. She has published three books and dozens of articles on topics ranging from Impressionism to contemporary photography. Her many awards include Guggenheim, Getty, and Social Science Research Council fellowships, as well as grants from the Mellon, Howard, and Kress Foundations.

Leila HilalVisiting Faculty
Director of the Middle East Task Force, New America Foundation
Leila Hilal is Director of the Middle East Task Force at the New America Foundation. She focuses on Syria, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and issues related to U.S. foreign policy, community-based change, constitution-making, and transitional justice in the broader Middle East and North Africa. Prior to joining New America Hilal served as Senior Policy Adviser to the Commissioner-General of the Palestinian refugee agency (UNRWA) and as a legal adviser to Palestinian negotiators from 2002-2008. She has led numerous research missions on human rights and post-conflict scenario building and transitional justice in the Middle East, including for Chatham House, the International Center for Transitional Justice and the Euro-Med Human Rights Network for Human Rights.

Jennifer Hirsch's principal areas of expertise are gender, sexuality, and reproductive health, U.S.-Mexico migration and migrant health, the comparative anthropology of love, and the applications of anthropological theory and methods to public health research and programs. She has published articles in journals such as American Journal of Public Health, Studies in Family Planning, AIDS, and Culture Health and Sexuality.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Marianne Hirsch is William Peterfield Trent Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and Professor in the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. She is immediate past president of the Modern Language Association of America. She was born in Romania, and educated at Brown University where she received her BA/MA and Ph.D. degrees. Before moving to Columbia, she taught at Dartmouth College.

Maggie HoffmanVisiting Faculty
Director, Project DOCC

Maggie Hoffman is co-founder and the director of Project DOCC - Delivery of Chronic Care.  In this unique medical education program, parents of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and family caregivers of adults with chronic conditions teach doctors and other health professionals about living with illness and disability in their communities. Project DOCC’s pediatric program is in 28 academic medical centers across the United States and in Australia. Maggie is a founder and member of the New York Self-Determination Coalition (nyselfd).

Maja HornFaculty
Associate Professor, Spanish & Latin American Cultures

Maja Horn is Associate Professor and Chair of Spanish and Latin American Cultures at Barnard College. She specializes in contemporary Hispanophone Caribbean literature, visual and performance art, gender and sexuality, and political culture. She is the author of Masculinity after Trujillo: The Politics of Gender in Dominican Literature (University Press of Florida in 2014) and is currently completing a second monograph on queer Dominican literature, visual and performance art. She has also published on Latin American and Caribbean arts for various Dominican and U.S.

Jean HowardExecutive Committee
Professor of English and Comparative Literature
Jean E. Howard is the George Delacorte Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University where she teaches early modern literature, Shakespeare, feminist studies, and theater history. Howard has authored over fifty essays; and her books include Shakespeare’s Art of Orchestration: Stage Technique and Audience Response (1984); The Stage and Social Struggle in Early Modern England (1994); Engendering a Nation: A Feminist Account of Shakespeare’s English Histories (1997), co-written with Phyllis Rackin; Theater of a City: The Places of London Comedy 1598-1642 (2007), which won the Barnard Hewitt Prize for the outstanding work of theater history for 2008, and Marx and Shakespeare in the Great Shakespeareans series (2012), co-written with Crystal Bartolovich.
Amy E. HughesVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Theater, City University of New York

Amy E. Hughes is Assistant Professor and Deputy Chair for Graduate Studies in the Department of Theater, Brooklyn College (CUNY). Her work focuses on the relationship between theater/performance and visual, print, and material culture in nineteenth-century America.

Lecturer, Program in Narrative Medicine

Marsha Hurst is on the faculty team of Columbia’s Program in Narrative Medicine and is a research scholar at Columbia University’s Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy, where she is coordinating a faculty seminar on narrative genetics. She is also a consultant on health advocacy programs, issues, and education with particular interest in women’s health and aging. She has consulted for the Medicare Rights Center and is adviser to their advocacy programs, and works with the women’s health reform coalition, Raising Women’s Voices.

Villard Professor of German and Comparative Literature

Andreas Huyssen is the Villard Professor of German and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, where he served as founding director of the Center for Comparative Literature and Society (1998-2003). He chaired the Department of Germanic Languages from 1986-1992 and again from 2005-2008.

Manuela InfanteVisiting Faculty
Theater Director

Nació en Santiago, en 1980. Actriz, dramaturga y directora, es egresada de la Escuela de Teatro de la Universidad de Chile. Se suman a estos, sus estudios de Puesta en Escena y Analisis de Texto cursados en el HB Studio en Nueva York, Estados Unidos. Como actriz ha participado en el elenco de Las Troyanas de Rodrigo Pérez, Fuera de foco, dirigida por Cristián Marambio, Esa, escrita por Alejandro Moreno y Ciudadanos dirigida por Alexis Moreno.

Sibel IrzıkVisiting Faculty

Sibel Irzık is currently teaching comparative literature in Sabancı University. She is the author of Deconstruction and the Politics of Criticism (Garland, 1990) and the co-editor of Relocating the Fault Lines: Turkey Beyond the East-West Divide (South Atlantic Quarterly, 2003). Among her other publications are “Istanbul: The Black Book,” in The Novel, ed. Franco Moretti, Princeton U. P., 2006; “Orhan Pamuk's Snow: Re-imagining the Boundaries between East and West, Art and Politics,” in Europe and Its Boundaries, eds.

James P. Shenton Assistant Professor of the Core Curriculum

Turkuler Isiksel (Ph.D., Yale) works in contemporary political theory and is particularly interested in political institutions beyond the nation-state. Professor Isiksel combines the perspectives of normative theory, legal analysis, and institutionalist political science in her research. She is particularly interested in how descriptive and normative categories tailored to the nation-state apply to institutions that wield political power beyond that context.

Islah JadVisiting Faculty
Lecturer on gender issues and politics, International Affairs Department, Qatar University

Islah Jad is a lecturer on gender issues and politics, International Affairs Department, Qatar University. She is the former director of the Women's Studies Institute at Birzeit University.  

Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Women's Gender and Sexuality Studies and Director, Center for Research on Women, Barnard College
Janet R. Jakobsen is Claire Tow Professor of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies and former Director of the Center for Research on Women at Barnard College, where she has also served as Dean for Faculty Diversity and Development.
Fiona JenkinsVisiting Faculty
Senior Lecturer, Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University

Fiona Jenkins is a senior lecturer in the School of Philosophy, RSSS, ANU. She teaches on contemporary French philosophy, on Nietzsche, on film, and on aspects of democratic theory. Following a DPhil at Oxford (with a thesis on Nietzsche, 'Becoming What We Are: On Realism, Revaluation and Self-Representation in Nietzsche's Philosophy') she spent two years teaching at Essex University, taking up a post-doc. at Sydney University in 1997 and moving to ANU in 2002. She has two children and is rediscovering the reasons for feminism.

Stephanie Jensen-MoultonVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Musicology, Brooklyn College

Stephanie Jensen-Moulton, Assistant Professor of Musicology at Brooklyn College, has published articles on women in hip-hop, the 19th-century piano prodigy "Blind Tom" Wiggins, feminist pedagogy and other topics in American music. She has presented papers and lecture-recitals at numerous national and international conferences, including IASPM Rome and national meetings of the Society for American Music and the American Musicological Society. She received the Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University

Art historian Dr. Kellie Jones is Associate Professor in the Department of Art History and Archaeology, as well as the Institute for Research in African American Studies at Columbia University. Her research interests include African American and African Diaspora artists, Latino/a and Latin American Artists, and issues in contemporary art and museum theory.

Martha S. JonesVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of History and Afroamerican Studies, and Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Martha S. Jones is Associate Professor of History and Afroamerican Studies, and Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Jones holds a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University (2001) and a J.D. from the CUNY School of Law (1987). She currently serves as a 2008 Visiting Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the National Constitution Center.

Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Professor Jordan-Young is a sociomedical scientist whose research includes social epidemiology studies of HIV/AIDS, and evaluation of biological work on sex, gender and sexuality. Prior to joining the faculty at Barnard College, she was a Principal Investigator and Deputy Director of the Social Theory Core at the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research of the National Development and Research Institutes, Inc., and has been a Health Disparities Scholar sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Assistant Professor, School of Theatre, Catholic University, Chile

Dr. María José Contreras is a performance artist and Professor in the Theater School at the Catholic University in Chile, as well as an actress and theatre director. Her creative work and her research focus on the relationship between the body, memory and performance. She has worked as a theatre director in both Chile and Europe.

Kelly Baker JosephsVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor, English, City University of New York

Kelly Baker Josephs, Associate Professor of English, specializes in World Anglophone Literature with an emphasis on Caribbean Literature. She teaches courses in Anglophone Caribbean Literature, Postcolonial Literature and Theory, Literatures of the African Diaspora, and Gender Studies. Her book Disturbers of the Peace: Representations of Insanity in Anglophone Caribbean Literature (U of Virginia P, 2013), considers the ubiquity of madmen and madwomen in Caribbean literature between 1959 and 1980.

Nick JuravichGraduate Student

Nick Juravich is a doctoral student in United States History, studying education, labor organizing, social policy, urban history, and social movements in the twentieth century. His dissertation, provisionally titled "An Education in Democracy: Paraprofessionals in Schools, Communities, and the Labor Movement, 1965-1980," examines the changing relationships between public schools, local communities, and public sector unions in this era. 

Suzanne KahnGraduate Student
PhD Student, History

Suzanne Kahn is a Ph.D. candidate in the U.S. History program. She works at the intersection of legal history, women’s history, and American Political Development. Her dissertation, “Divorce and the Politics of the Social Welfare Regime, 1969-2001,” examines how rising divorce rates shaped the politics and policies around women’s access to economic resources. 

Andrés KalawskiVisiting Faculty
Theater, Faculty of Arts, Pontificia Universidad de Chile, playwright

Andrés Kalawski studied acting and playwriting at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, and received his Masters in Literature at Universidad de Chile. He is now working on his dissertation for a PhD in History, and is currently Associate Professor at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Banu KaracaVisiting Faculty

Banu Karaca (Ph.D. Cultural Anthropology, Graduate Center-CUNY) is a Visiting Scholar at Sabanci University's Faculty of Arts and Sciences. She is currently completing a manuscript, which examines how divergent claims regarding the civic, political and economic impact of art are mediated in the art worlds of Berlin and Istanbul.

Katrina KarkazisVisiting Faculty
Senior Research Scholar, Center for Biomedical Ethics, Stanford University

Katrina Karkazis is an anthropologist and bioethicist at the Center for Biomedical Ethics at Stanford University and a faculty affiliate in the Program for Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, also at Stanford.

Her recent work examines "gender verification" of elite female athletes. An article analyzing the latest policies was published in the American Journal of Bioethics

Commentaries have appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, New Scientist, and Discover.

Associate Professor of English and Director of the American Studies Program

Jennie A. Kassanoff is an Associate Professor of English at Barnard College where she directs the Program in American Studies.  She is the author of Edith Wharton and the Politics of Race (Cambridge, 2004) and is currently working on an essay on stupidity in the fiction of Henry James and a book on voting in American literature.

Robin J. KemperGraduate Student

Robin J. Kemper is currently studying for her M.S. in Narrative Medicine at Columbia University.  Hoping professionally to write and teach on disability-related matters, Robin has twice taught a Narrative Medicine seminar to Columbia University postbaccalaureate premedical students and undergraduate premedical students.  She is also a Curriculum Committee Representative in the Narrative Medicine program.  Robin earned her J.D. at Yale Law School and her B.A. in English at Yale University.

R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History in Honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower

Alice Kessler-Harris, R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History. She is also Professor in the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Dr. Kessler-Harris specializes in the history of American labor and the comparative and interdisciplinary exploration of women and gender. She received her B. A. from Goucher College (1961) and her Ph.D. from Rutgers (1968).

Sameera KhanVisiting Faculty

Sameera Khan is a Mumbai-based independent journalist, writer, and researcher. A former assistant editor at The Times of India, she is currently a fellow at the TISS, PUKAR & Max Planck Institute Urban Aspirations Project.

Eva Feder KittayVisiting Faculty
Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Stony Brook University, SUNY

Eva Feder Kittay is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at Stony Brook University/SUNY. Among her most recent major publications are “On the Margins of Moral Personhood” (Ethics, October 2005) and Blackwell Studies in Feminist Philosophy (with Linda Alcoff, 2006) and Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy (with Licia Carlson, Blackwell 2010).

Sarah KleinsteinGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University

Sarah Kleinstein is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology at Duke University, currently studying under Dr. David Goldstein in the Institute for Genomic Medicine at Columbia University. Her primary research focus is determining the genetic underpinnings behind differential responses to infectious diseases, such as HIV-1, HSV-2, HCV, and HBV. Kleinstein also holds a BS in Biochemistry and an MS in Genetic Epidemiology (both from the University of Washington, Seattle).

Nancy KricorianVisiting Faculty

Nancy Kricorian is the author of the novels Zabelle, Dreams of Bread and Fire, and All The Light There Was, which is set in the Armenian community of Paris during World War II. She is a widely published poet and essayist, whose work has appeared in The Antioch Review, Parnassus, In These Times, The Minnesota Review, Women’s Studies Quarterly, and other journals.

Mirjam KünklerVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor in the Department for Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University

Mirjam Künkler (Ph.D., Columbia University) is Assistant Professor in the Department for Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University, USA. She has published on religion-state relations and Islamic thought in 20th century Iran and Indonesia, and edited with Alfred Stepan, Indonesia, Islam and Democracy, Columbia University Press (2013), and with John Madeley and Shylashri Shankar, A Secular Age: Beyond the West, (2014).

Assistant Professor, Latin American Literature, Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, Stony Brook University
Lena Burgos Lafuente (PhD NYU, 2011) is Assistant Professor of Latin American Literature in the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, Stony Brook University. She specializes in poetry, Latin American essay writing, sound studies, and transatlantic literary crossings in the first half of the twentieth century.
Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College and Columbia University
Brian Larkin is Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University and the author of Signal and Noise: Media Infrastructure and Urban Culture in Nigeria (Duke University Press, 2008).  With Lila Abu-Lughod and Faye Ginsburg he co-edited Media Worlds: Anthropology on New Terrain (University of California Press, 2000). His research examines the introduction of media technologies in Nigeria – cinema, radio, digital media - and the religious, political, and cultural changes they bring about.
Professor, Acting Chair, and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Italian

Elizabeth Leake is professor, Acting Chair, and Director of Graduate Studies in the Italian Department at Columbia. Her research interests include Twentieth Century narrative and theatre, psychoanalytic, ideological, and disability studies in Italian literature, fascist Italy, Italian cinema, and early Danish cinema.

Assistant Professor of Luso-Brazilian Studies, Columbia University
Ana Paulina Lee is Assistant Professor of Luso-Brazilian Studies at Columbia University. Her research and teaching focus on the intersection of cultural studies and political philosophy, race relations and hemispheric American histories of slavery and immigration, Asian and African diasporic cultures in the Americas, performance and memory studies. Prior to joining the department of Latin American and Iberian Cultures, Lee was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana.
Maxine Greene Professor of Education
Nancy Lesko's interests center around curriculum theory and history, conceptions of children and youth in theory and practice, gender issues in education, and citizenship education in times of war.
Assistant Professor of History

Natasha Lightfoot, Assistant Professor, Columbia University Department of History, teaches within the fields of Caribbean, Atlantic World, and African Diaspora History on the subjects of slavery, emancipation, race, and labor relations. She received her B.A.in History from Yale University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in History from New York University. Her current book project focuses on black working people's resistance in colonial British Antigua after emancipation.

Lydia LiuExecutive Committee
Wun Tsun Tam Professor in the Humanities, Director, Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, Columbia University

Lydia H. Liu is a theorist of media and translation, a scholar of comparative literature, and a bilingual writer in Chinese and English. She is the Wun Tsun Tam Professor in the Humanities and the Director of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University.

Bernardita LlanosVisiting Faculty
Professor, Spanish Language and Literature, Chairperson, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, Loyola University Chicago

Bernardita Llanos M. is Professor of Spanish Language and Literature at Loyola University Chicago. She received her PhD in Hispanic and Luso-Brasilian Literatures and Linguistics from the University of Minnesota. In 1994 she published (Re)descubrimiento y (re)conquista de América en la ilustración española, which received a publication grant from the Program of Cultural Cooperation between Spain's Ministry of Culture and U.S. universities.

Nadia LoanVisiting Faculty
University of Oregon
Nadia Loan is a socio-cultural anthropologist whose research interests focus on Islam and modernity, gender, religion and media and textual traditions. She is currently teaching at the University of Oregon on modern Islam, gender in Muslim societies, and new media practices in South Asia. She received her PhD in anthropology from Columbia University in 2012.
Elena LoizidouVisiting Faculty
Senior Lecturer in Law, Birkbeck Law, UK

Dr Elena Loizidou, BA (Keele) LLM, PhD (Lancaster), Senior Lecturer in Law, joined the School of Law, Birbeck in January 2000. Dr Loizidou is the Programme Director & Admissions Tutor for the FT LLB (UCAS). Dr Loizidou's research interests include anarchism and political theory, theories of gender and sexuality and law and culture. Dr Loizidou is currently working on a monograph on anarchist practices and theory.

Director, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race; Professor of Anthropology, CSER and Latino/a Studies

Claudio Lomnitz works on the history, politics and culture of Latin America, and particularly of Mexico. He received his PhD from Stanford in 1987, and his first book, Evolución de una sociedad rural (Mexico City, 1982) was a study of politics and cultural change in Tepoztlán, Mexico. After that he developed an interest in conceptualizing the nation-state as a kind of cultural region, a theme that culminated in Exits from the Labyrinth: Culture and Ideology in Mexican National Space (California, 1992).

Kena LorenziniVisiting Faculty
Photographer
María Eugenia Lorenzini nació en Talca. Sicóloga de profesión, desarrolló un importante trabajo como fotógrafa, formando parte de una generación que buscó retratar el rostro gris de Chile durante la dictadura militar. En esos años trabajó como reportera gráfica en el semanario Hoy y la revista Análisis, labor gracias a la cual reunió un importante archivo fotográfico que concentró en su libro Fragmento fotográfico, arte, narración y memoria. Chile 1980-1990.
Amanda LotspikeVisiting Faculty
Project Collaborator and Researcher, ESE:O

Amanda Lotspike graduated Phi Beta Kappa at the University of California, Davis with a B.A. in International Relations and Women and Gender Studies. With support from the U.S. State Department’s Gilman International Scholarship and the UC Davis President’s Fellowship, she carried out ethnographic research in Santiago, Chile in 2011, working to understand how community health promoters in popular sectors of Santiago push the ontological notions of the body within a neoliberal political economy. She is currently working as a Project Collaborator and Researcher for ESE:O.

Heather LoveVisiting Faculty
R. Jean Brownlee Term Associate Professor of English, University of Pennsylvania

Heather Love is R. Jean Brownlee Term Associate Chair at the University of Pennsylvania where she teaches courses in twentieth-century literature and culture, queer studies, disability studies, film, and critical theory. She is the author of Feeling Backward: Loss and the Politics of Queer History (2007) and the editor of a special issue of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies on the scholarship and legacy of Gayle Rubin ("Rethinking Sex").

Janet LyonVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of English, Penn State University

Janet Lyon co-developed the Disability Studies program at Penn State, and subsequently created the undergraduate minor in Disability Studies, which she currently directs.  She has published widely on the literature and culture of modernism and is at work on a book linking the conceptual appearance of disability as concept with the coeval development of modernist aesthetics.  She has delivered several invited talks on this subject, and recently published a portion of the project appeared in the flagship field journal Modernism/modernity: “On the Asylum Road with Woolf and Mew” (18.3

Herbert Lehman Professor of Government MESAAS, International Affairs, and Anthropology

Mahmood Mamdani is the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1974 and specializes in the study of African history and politics. His works explore the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and the history and theory of human rights.

Amar MandaviaGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Clinical Psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University

Amar Mandavia is currently a first year doctoral student pursuing clinical psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. He has previously worked at the NYC Department of Housing as a field interviewer for a longitudinal study examining impact of providing affordable housing upon physical and mental health outcomes among chronically homeless people. At the Emory School of Medicine, he worked as a field researcher examining genetic and trauma-related risk factors for PTSD in a cross-sectional study of low socioeconomic and urban minority population.

Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Sharon Marcus is Dean of Humanities and Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University as well as the co-founder and co-editor in chief of Public Books, a bimonthly review of books, arts, and ideas.  

Lianna MarksGraduate Student
Fellow, Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Children's Hospital of New York and Columbia University Medical Center

Lianna Marks is a Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Fellow at the Children's Hospital of New York and Columbia University Medical Center. She is a graduate of Columbia College and the Indiana University School of Medicine and completed her pediatric residency at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Her interest in Global Health has lead her to clinical work in Kenya, Guatemala, Costa Rica, and the Dominican Republic. Her research investigates using natural killer cell immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer.

Professor of Architecture, Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation
Reinhold Martin is Professor of Architecture at Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, where he directs the PhD program in architecture and the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture. He is a member of Columbia’s Institute for Comparative Literature and Society as well as the Committee on Global Thought. Martin is a founding co-editor of the journal Grey Room and has published widely on the history and theory of modern and contemporary architecture.
Hebe MattosVisiting Faculty
Professor of History, University Federal Fluminense

Hebe Mattos is Professor of History at University Federal Fluminense (UFF) in Brazil. She was visiting Professor at Columbia University (Ruth Cardoso Chair, ILAS/Institute of Latin America Studies, 2013/2014), at Ecoles des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (2004) and at the University of Michigan (1996). She is the author or co-author of numerous books on Brazilian slavery and post-emancipation society, including Memórias do Cativeiro. Família, Trabalho e Cidadania no Pós-Abolição/ Memories of Captivity.

Julie E. MaybeeVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Lehman College, City University of New York

Julie E. Maybee is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Lehman College, City University of New York (CUNY).  She is the Coordinator of the new Disability Studies Minor at Lehman, and is affiliated with the Masters in Disability Studies Program in the School of Professional Studies at CUNY along with the Department of African and African American Studies at Lehman.

Anne McClintockVisiting Faculty
Professor of English and Gender Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Anne McClintock's research interests include: Victorian British Literature and Culture, Twentieth Century American Culture and Literature, Gender Studies and Theories of Sexuality, Colonial and Postcolonial Literature and Culture, Irish Literature and Culture.  She is the author of Simone de Beauvoir (1990); Olive Shreiner (1991); Imperial Leather: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Colonial Contest (1995) and co-editor of Dangerous Liaisons: Gender, Nation and Postcolonial Perspectives (1997); and Of Race and Queer Sexuality (1999).

Liza McIntoshGraduate Student

Liza McIntosh is a PhD student in the department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia. She is broadly interested in the culture and texts of the Early Modern period, with a focus on questions of gender, sexuality, and nature. She received her BA from Johns Hopkins University in English and Art History.

Mary McLeod is a Professor of Architecture at Columbia GSAPP, where she teaches architecture history and theory, and occasionally studio. She has also taught at Harvard University, University of Kentucky, University of Miami and the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies. Her research and publications have focused on the history of the modern movement and on contemporary architecture theory, examining issues concerning the connections between architecture and ideology.

K. Melodi McSweeneyGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Genetics and Development, Columbia University

K. Melodi McSweeney is a fourth year PhD candidate in Genetics whose research focuses on modelling the effect of mutations that cause neurological disorders. Melodi is originally from Belize City, Belize and moved to Chicago, IL in 2008 to finish her Bachelor’s Degree in Molecular Biology at Loyola University Chicago. Melodi went on to complete a Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program at the University of Michigan in the Human Genetics department where she studied atypical progeria and DNA damage due to hydroxyurea, a treatment for sickle cell anemia.

Laura McTigheGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Religion, Columbia University

Laura McTighe is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Religion at Columbia University. She comes to her doctoral studies through nearly twenty years of grassroots activism to end state violence and advance community healing. Her research examines the co-constitution of race and religion, of gender and governance, in the American and Global South today by ethnographically centering women’s geographies and archives of struggle.

Frank MecklenburgVisiting Faculty
Director of Research and Chief Archivist, Leo Baeck Institute

Dr. Frank Mecklenburg is Director of Research and Chief Archivist at Leo Baeck Institute, a research library and archive that documents the history and culture of German-speaking Jewry, primarily in the 19th and 20th centuries, but also including documents dating back to the middle ages. LBI was founded in 1955 as a repository for the books, papers, photos and documents that were salvaged from Central Europe after World War II and donated to the Institute.

Susan MeiselasVisiting Faculty

Susan Meiselas received her B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and her M.A. in visual education from Harvard University. Her first major photographic essay focused on the lives of women doing striptease at New England country fairs. She photographed the carnivals during three consecutive summers while teaching photography in the New York public schools. CARNIVAL STRIPPERS was published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in 1976. A selection was installed at the Whitney Museum of Art in June 2000. The original book was revised and reprinted by the Whitney Museum and Steidl Verlag in 2003.

Susan MeiselasVisiting Faculty
Photographer

Susan Meiselas received her B.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and her M.A. in visual education from Harvard University. She joined Magnum Photos in 1976.  She is the author of three books: Carnival Strippers, Nicaragua, and Pandora's Box and editor of five collections: Learn to See, El Salvador: The Work of 30 Photographers, Chile from Within., Kurdistan: In the Shadow of History and Encounters with the Dani.  She has co-directed two films: "Living at Risk" and "Pictures from a Revolution" with Richard P.

Ariel MerkelGraduate Student
Sociology, The New School for Social Research

Ariel Merkel is a Sociology PhD candidate at the New School for Social Research, with a focus on disability studies.  She earned her MA at NSSR in May 2011, and holds a BA (cum laude) in Cultural Anthropology from Wells College, a small women’s college in the Finger Lakes region of New York State.  Upon graduation in 2005, she was awarded the Carter A. Woods Prize for her thesis, which analyzed the strategies of Kanaka Maoli (indigenous Hawaiian) activists involved in the Cultural Revitalization Movement.

John MichalczykGraduate Student
Sociology, The New School for Social Research

John Michalczyk is a doctoral student in Sociology at the New School for Social Research, currently working on a project exploring disability in virtual worlds. His other interests include social interaction, ethnography, and identity formation. John combines his academic research in Sociology on disabilities, hidden and visible, with his interest in documentary filmmaking.

Nancy K. MillerVisiting Faculty
Professor of English, French and Comparative Literature, Graduate Center, CUNY

Nancy K. Miller is currently working on a project about the experience of girls and young women in the American 1950s, about private life and middlebrow culture; also a project on the nature of extreme experience and its recording in testimony and other documents. Continuing interests include questions of autobiography and memoir, feminist theory, women's writing, trauma and testimony.

Mara MillsVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication, New York University

Mara Mills is Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University. She received her Ph.D.

Susannah B. MintzVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of English, Skidmore College

Susannah B. Mintz is associate professor of English at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY. She is the author of Threshold Poetics: Milton and Intersubjectivity (2003) and Unruly Bodies: Life Writing by Women with Disabilities (2007), and co-editor with Lisa Johnson of On the Literary Nonfiction of Nancy Mairs: A Critical Anthology (2011). Her current project is entitled Hurt and Pain: A Literary History.

Ziba Mir-HosseiniVisiting Faculty
SOAS, University of London (the School of Oriental and African Studies)

Ziba Mir-Hosseini is a legal anthropologist, specializing in Islamic law, gender and development. She has a BA in Sociology from Tehran University (1974) and a PhD in Social Anthropology from University of Cambridge (1980).

Nicholas MirzoeffVisiting Faculty
Professor of Art and Art Education, NYU
Nicholas Mirzoeff is a visual culture theorist and professor in the Department of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University. He is best known for his work developing the field of visual culture and for his many books and his widely used textbook on the subject.
Jennifer MittelstadtVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor

I am a political historian of the United States writing about women and gender, race, and the state.

Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Hlonipha Mokoena's main area of interest is South African intellectual history. One of the defining characteristics of South Africa is that it is a society that ostensibly lacks a collective history or shared philosophical and political traditions. The main objective of Professor Mokoena's teaching is to introduce students to the contested histories of South African political ideas and traditions.

Anjali MonteiroVisiting Faculty
Professor and Dean, School of Media and Cultural Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences

Dr. Anjali Monteiro is Professor and Dean, School of Media and Cultural Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. She has a Masters degree in Economics and a Ph.D. in Sociology. She is involved in documentary production, media teaching and research. Jointly with K.P. Jayasankar, she has made over 35 documentary films. Their work has been screened extensively at film festivals all over the world and they have won twenty-two national and international awards.

Annelies MoorsVisiting Faculty
Professor of Anthropology and Sociology, University of Amsterdam

Annelies Moors studied Arabic at the University of Damascus and Arabic and anthropology at the University of Amsterdam. She holds the chair for contemporary Muslim societies at the department of sociology and anthropology at the University of Amsterdam. She is co-director of the research programme group ‘Globalizing Culture and the Quest for Belonging: Ethnographies of the Everyday’, and director of the research programme Muslim Cultural Politics at the AiSSR (Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research).

Ed MoralesFaculty
Lecturer, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University
Ed Morales is an author and journalist who has written for The Nation, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Rolling Stone, the Guardian, and City Limits, among many others. He is a former Village Voice staff writer and Newsday columnist and the author of Living in Spanglish (St. Martins) and The Latin Beat (Da Capo Press), as well as the upcoming Raza Matters (Verso Press).
Subodh MoreVisiting Faculty
Activist and Journalist
Jennifer L. MorganVisiting Faculty
Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History, NYU
Jennifer L. Morgan is professor of history and of social and cultural analysis at New York University. Her research examines the intersections of gender and race in colonial America, and she is author of Laboring Women: Gender and Reproduction in the Making of New World Slavery (2004). She is currently at work on a project that considers colonial numeracy, racism, and the rise of the transatlantic slave trade, tentatively entitled “Accounting for the Women in Slavery.”
Professor of History, Department of Social and Cultural Analysis and the Department of History, New York University

Jennifer L. Morgan is the author of Laboring Women: Gender and Reproduction in the Making of New World Slavery (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004).  Her research examines the intersections of gender and race in colonial America.  She is at work on a project that considers colonial numeracy, racism, and the rise of the trans-Atlantic slave trade in the seventeenth-century English Atlantic, tentatively titled Accounting for the Women in Slavery.

Professor of Anthropology

Rosalind Morris focuses her fieldwork in two main areas: Thailand and South Africa. Over the past decade, she has devoted her attention to thinking about a number of inter-related issues and questions concerning: the history of modernity in Southeast Asia and the place of the mass media in its development; the relationships between value and violence; the sexualization of power and desire; the theorization of gender; and the history of anthropological thought and social theory. In her writings on all of these issues, she attends to questions of representation.

Professor of Comparative Literature, University of California, Los Angeles

Aamir Mufti is interested in understanding a range of forms of inequality in the contemporary world and how they impede the possibilities for historically autonomous action by social collectivities in the South. His work also explores the possibilities of critical knowledge of these societies within the dominant practices of the modern humanistic disciplines. Mufti has a Ph.D. in literature from Columbia University and was trained in Anthropology at Columbia, the London School of Economics, and Hamilton College.

Sarah MuirFaculty
Term Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College, Columbia University

Sarah Muir is Term Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College, Columbia University. Her work examines the practical logics of economic investment, ethical evaluation, and political critique, with a particular focus on social class and financial crisis. Situated at the intersection of semiotic, political-economic, and historical anthropology, her research is grounded in ethnographic fieldwork in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs

Dipali Mukhopadhyay teaches international security at the School of International and Public Affairs, where she is a faculty affiliate of the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies. She recently published the book Warlords, Strongman Governors and State Building in Afghanistan (Cambridge, 2014). Prior to joining SIPA and Saltzman, Mukhopadhyay spent 2011 as a post-doctoral fellow at Princeton University.

Donna MurchVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of History, Rutgers University

Donna Murch is an associate professor of history at Rutgers University and a former codirector of the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, where she directed the Black Atlantic seminar. Her teaching and research focus on postwar U.S. history, modern African American history, twentieth-century urban studies, and the political economy of drugs. She is the author of Living for the City: Migration, Education, and the Rise of the Black Panther Party in Oakland, California (2010), which won the Phillis Wheatley Book Award.

Sean MurrayGraduate Student
Musicology, CUNY Graduate Center

Sean Murray is a doctoral student in musicology at the CUNY Graduate Center. He has presented numerous conference papers on race and gender in American music, and published on the relationship between the nineteenth century piano industry and the African ivory and slave trades. His dissertation examines the intersection of race and disability in American music. Sean was the recipient of a graduate student fellowship at the National Museum of American History at the Smithsonian Institution.

Premilla NadasenExecutive Committee
Visiting Associate Professor in History

Premilla Nadasen is a visiting professor at Barnard College. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1999 and her B.A. from the University of Michigan. Her dissertation on the welfare rights movement was nominated from the Bancroft Award. Her book, Welfare Warriors: The Welfare Rights Movement in the United States (Routeledge 2005), outlines the ways in which African American women on welfare forged a feminism of their own out of the political and cultural circumstances of the late 1960s and 1970s.

Associate Director, Barnard Center for Research on Women

Tami Navarro is a cultural anthropologist who holds a Ph.D. from Duke University. She is the Associate Director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women and Executive Editor of the Center’s online journal, Scholar and Feminist Online. Her work has been funded by the Mellon Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the American Anthropological Association, and the Ford Foundation. Dr. Navarro has held positions at Rutgers University, Wesleyan University, and Columbia University.

Associate Professor, Africana Studies and History, Barnard College
Celia E. Naylor is an Associate Professor in Africana Studies and History at Barnard College, Columbia University. Before joining the Barnard College faculty in 2010, she was Assistant Professor and then promoted to a tenured Associate Professor of History at Dartmouth College (2002-2010). 
 
Professor Naylor earned her B.A. in Africana Studies (Summa Cum Laude) from Cornell University, an M.A. in Afro-American Studies from UCLA, and an M.A. and Ph.D.
Frances Negrón-MuntanerExecutive Committee
Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race

Frances Negrón-Muntaner is an award-winning filmmaker, writer, curator, scholar and professor at Columbia University, where she is the director of Columbia’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race and founding director of the Media and Idea Lab. Among her books and publications are: Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the Latinization of American Culture (CHOICE Award, 2004), The Latino Media Gap (2014), and Sovereign Acts (forthcoming). Her most recent films include "Small City, Big Change" (2013), "War for Guam" (2015) and "Life Outside" (2016).

 

 

Professor of Sociology and Women and Gender Studies
Alondra Nelson is Professor in the Department of Sociology and Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at Columbia University. Nelson is the author of Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination (University of Minnesota Press, 2011), which was recognized with four scholarly awards, including the Mirra Komarovsky Book Award from the Eastern Sociological Society and theDistinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award from the American Sociological Association (Section on Race, Gender and Class). A finalist for the C. Wright Mills Award, Body and Soul is the first book-length exploration of the radical organization’s health-focused activities.
Nancy NichollsVisiting Faculty
History, Pontificia Universidad de Chile / History, Universidad Academia di Humanismo Cristiano

La profesora Nancy Nicholls se ha especializado en las temáticas de historia y memoria, e historia del tiempo presente, utilizando entre otras, la metodología de la historia oral. Actualmente participa como co-investigadora en el Proyecto Fondecyt Regular ‘Antropología e historia de la industria ballenera en Chile (1935-1983)’, dirigido por Daniel Quiroz. Participa, en calidad de asesora e investigadora, del proyecto de creación del ‘Archivo Testimonial de víctimas de la Represión, 1975-1990’, de la Fundación de Ayuda Social de las Iglesias Cristianas, FASIC.

Akemi NishidaGraduate Student
Social Personality Psychology, CUNY

Akemi Nishida is a doctoral student in the social personality psychology PhD program and an adjunct lecturer in Psychology and Disability Studies at City University of New York. Using frameworks of social justice studies and critical disability studies, her work focuses on the politicization of disabled people and community building in relation to intersecting oppression and privilege. She is also a performer in a project ‘GIMP’ by Heidi Latsky Dance and a starting member of DISLABELEDtv, a media organization by disabled youth/young adults.

Lorie NovakVisiting Faculty
Professor of Photography and Imaging, NYU

Lorie Novak's photographs, installations, and Internet projects have been in numerous exhibitions including solo exhibitions at ArtSway, Hampshire, England; The International Center of Photography, NY; Center for Creative Photography, Tucson, AZ; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Houston Center for Photography; Breda Fotografica, the Netherlands; Jayne Baum Gallery, NY; University Art Museum, California State Univ. Long Beach; Addison Gallery, Andover, MA; and Stanford University Art Museum.

Isin OnolGraduate Student
Visiting Lecturer and PhD Candidate, University of Applied Arts, Vienna

Isin Onol (1977, Turkey) has been producing exhibitions and other art related events as an independent curator based in Vienna since 2009. She worked as the director/curator at Proje4L/Elgiz Museum of Contemporary Art, Istanbul (2006-2009). In 2014, she worked as the guest curator at Schauraum Angewandte, at the MuseumsQuartier of Vienna, as well as teaching as a guest lecturer at the Digital Art program at the University of the Applied Arts, Vienna, Austria.

Ayse ParlaVisiting Faculty
Sabanci University (Turkey)

Ayse Parla is on the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Sabanci University (Turkey).  She is the recipient  of a TUBITAK research grant for a collaborative project on "Forms of organization among new migrants: A comparative analysis of Bulgarian Turks, Iraqi Turkmens and Moldavians in Turkey." (with Mine Eder and Didem Danis). Her recent publications include: "Irregular Workers or Ethnic Kin?

Anita Patil-DeshmukhVisiting Faculty

After a long and distinguished career as a faculty pediatrician/neonatologist in Chicago, and her time at HSPH, Dr. Anita Patil Deshmukh returned to her native India with a vision. The government of the state of Maharashtra had supported her education and, along with HPSH, given her the tools to become who she is today – medical doctor, advocate for populations without a voice, passionate believer in human dignity and the right to health – and Anita knew she wanted to give back to her country and community, and give others the opportunity to flourish.

Shilpa PhadkeVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor, Tata Institute of Social Sciences
Shilpa Phadke is assistant professor at the Centre for Media and Cultural Studies at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. She has been educated at St. Xavier’s College and SNDT University, Mumbai, and the University of Cambridge, UK.
Vidyadhar K. PhatakVisiting Faculty

Vidyadhar K. Phatak, after 37 years of experience in various sub-fields of urban planning and development in government agencies in Mumbai,retired from the service of Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority as its Principal Chief, Town and Country Planning Division on February 29, 2004. His interests include - Urban and Shelter Sector Studies, City Development Strategy, Preparation and appraisal of projects for the Development Banks and Financing local governments and Structuring projects for Public-Private-Partnership.

Suren PillayVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor, Center for Humanities Research, University of the Western Cape.

Associate Professor Suren Pillay is a Senior Researcher and Acting Director at the Center for Humanities Research. He holds a Phd (with Distinction) in Anthropology from Columbia University, and an MA (cum laude) in Development Studies from the University of the Western Cape. Between 2007 -2010 Suren was seconded to the Human Sciences Research Council of South Africa where he led research on the effects of violence and crime on citizenship in post-apartheid South Africa, and conducted research on migration and xenophobia.

Victoria Pitts-TaylorVisiting Faculty
Professor of Sociology, Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center

Victoria Pitts-Taylor is Professor of Sociology at Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. At the Graduate Center, she is also Director of the Center for the Study of Women and Society and Coordinator of the Women’s Studies Doctoral Certificate Program. She is author of two books, In the Flesh: the Cultural Politics of Body Modification and Surgery Junkies: Wellness and Pathology in Cosmetic Culture, as well as Editor of The Cultural Encyclopedia of the Body.

George Welwood Murray Professor of Legal History, Columbia Law School

Christina Duffy Ponsa is the George Welwood Murray Professor of Legal History at Columbia Law School, where she teaches constitutional law and American legal history. Professor Ponsa is the author of several articles on the constitutional law and history of American territorial expansion and empire, and co-editor of Foreign in a Domestic Sense: Puerto Rico, American Expansion, and the Constitution (Duke U. Press, 2001). She holds degrees from Princeton (A.B. 1990, Ph.D. 2010), Cambridge (M.Phil. 1995), and Yale (J.D. 1998).

Professor of Anthropology and Women's and Gender Studies

Elizabeth Povinelli's writing has focused on developing a critical theory of late liberalism. This critical task is grounded in theories of the translation, transfiguration and the circulation of values, materialities, and socialities within settler liberalisms. Her first two books focused on impasses within liberal systems of law and value as they meet local Australian indigenous worlds, and the effect of these impasses on the development of legal and public culture in Australia.

Eve PowellFaculty
Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania

Eve M. Troutt Powell teaches the history of the modern Middle East. As a cultural historian, she emphasizes the exploration of literature and film in her courses. She is the author of A Different Shade of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain and the Mastery of the Sudan (University of California, 2003) and the co-editor, with John Hunwick, of The African Diaspora in the Mediterranean Lands of Islam (Princeton Series on the Middle East, Markus Wiener Press, 2002).

Nicola PrattVisiting Faculty
Reader of the International Politics of the Middle East, University of Warwick, UK.
Nicola Pratt is Reader of the International Politics of the Middle East at the University of Warwick, UK. She has written on human rights, civil society and democratization in the Arab world, including Democracy and Authoritarianism in the Arab World (Lynne Rienner, 2007). More recently, she has written on issues of gender, war and security in the Middle East. She is co-author, with Nadje Al-Ali, of What Kind of Liberation? Women and the Occupation of Iraq (University of California Press, 2009), co-editor, also with Nadje Al-Ali, of Women and War in the Middle East (Zed Press, 2009) and co-editor with Sophie Richter-Devroe of a special issue of International Feminist Journal of Politics on ‘Critically Examining UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security’ (December 2011) as well as articles in International Studies Quarterly and Third World Quarterly, amongst others.
Gonzalo RabanalVisiting Faculty
Performer

Gonzalo Rabanal estudió Comunicación Audio Visual en el Instituto Arcos, periodo donde emprende la elaboración de un trabajo de obra que se proyecta de lo particular a lo colectivo, abriendo lugar a una multiplicidad expresiva. Ha sido reconocido el año 1989 con la beca Fundación Andes y el año 2010 con la beca Fundación Ford. Actualmente cursa como alumno de postgrado el Magíster en Artes Visuales en la pontificia universidad católica de chile.

Michael RalphVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Metropolitan Studies, NYU

Assistant Professor, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Metropolitan Studies; Assistant Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis , Africana Studies , American Studies ; Director, Metropolitan Studies Ph.D. 2007 (Anthropology), University of Chicago; M.A. 2002 (Anthropology), University of Chicago; B.A. 2000 (Africana Studies) Morris Brown College.

Areas of Research/Interest: Citizenship, Sovereignty, Risk, Liability, Urban Youth Culture, Diaspora, Postcolonialism

Assistant Professor of History and Afro American and African Studies, University of Michigan

Sherie Randolph is assistant professor of History and Afro American and African Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. The former Associate Director of the Women’s Research & Resource Center at Spelman College, Randolph received her Ph.D. from New York University in 19th- and 20th-century American history with concentrations in African Diaspora and women and gender history.

Associate Professor, History and Associate Director, Institute for Comparative Literature and Society
Anupama Rao has research and teaching interests in the history of anti-colonialism; caste and race; historical anthropology, social theory and intellectual history, and comparative urbanism. She is Senior Editor, Comparative Studies in South Asia, Africa and the Middle East. She has served as President, Society for the Advancement of South Asian History (American Historical Association), and on the South Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies. Her work has been supported by fellowships at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford) and the National Humanities Center (North Carolina), and by grants for the American Institute for Indian Studies, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Syed RazaGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Syed Raza is a master of public health candidate in the department of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University where he is also completing a certificate in the Social Determinants of Health. His work focuses on the political economy, sociocultural aspects, and research methodologies of public health. His research interests include historical sociology, geopolitics, science and technology studies, social epidemiology, world-ecology analysis, and critical animal studies.

Michael RembisVisiting Faculty
Director of the Center for Disability Studies and Professor of History, University at Buffalo

Michael A. Rembis is the Director of the Center for Disability Studies and an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University at Buffalo (SUNY). He came to Buffalo from the University of Notre Dame, where he was a visiting scholar in the Department of American Studies and the Department of History. His work, which has appeared in many journals and edited collections, has won several awards, including the 2008 Irving K. Zola Award, awarded annually by the Society for Disability Studies to emerging scholars.

Leticia RoblesGraduate Student
Performance Studies, NYU

Leticia Robles-Moreno is a PhD student at New York University’s Department of Performance Studies. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Humanities with emphasis in Linguistics and Literature from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú. She also holds a Master’s degree in Latin American Literature from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and has taught Spanish, Latin American culture, and Writing classes in several college levels.

Julia Miele RodasVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of English, City University of New York

Julia Miele Rodas is assistant professor of English at the City University of New York (CUNY). She teaches writing at CUNY’s Bronx Community College and is on the faculty of the Master’s program in Disability Studies at the CUNY School of Professional Studies. Her writing has appeared in Victorian Literature & Culture, Dickens Studies Annual, the Victorian Review, the Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, Disability Studies Quarterly, the Explicator, and other venues.

Professor and Chair, Institute for Comparative Literature and Society

Jesús Rodríguez-Velasco teaches Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Columbia. He has taught at the University of California, Berkeley, Universidad de Salamanca, Université de Paris III (Sorbonne Nouvelle), and the École Normale Supérieure (Lettres et Sciences Humaines). Among his publications are books and articles on Medieval and Early Modern knighthood, history of the book and reading, medieval political theory, law and culture, Occitan poetry, etc.

Assistant Professor of Clinical Bioethics, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Maya Sabatello is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Bioethics, at the Department of Psychiatry, and a Lecturer, at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University. A lawyer with a PhD in political science, and post-doctoral training from Harvard Medical School and Columbia University Medical Center, she specializes in bioethics, medical ethics, disability studies, international law and comparative human rights.

Leticia SabsayVisiting Faculty
Department of Politics and International Studies, The Open University

Leticia Sabsay is a Research Associate at the Department of Politics and International Studies at The Open University. Her appointment is part of the ‘Oecumene - Citizenship after Orientalism’ ERC project. Her areas of specialism encompass: critical social theory; feminist cultural and visual studies; and queer theory. Prior to taking on this role she studied sociology, and subsequently became Assistant Professor of Communications, at the University of Buenos Aires before leaving Argentina in 2002.

Zakia SalimeVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor in Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies, Rutger's

How to understand the complicities and cross-fertilizations of the discursive regimes of war and terror and neoliberal globalization? What are the gendered spaces in which states and neoliberal economic forces interest to produce gendered subjectivities, desires and agency? How does this interplay of classed, racialized and gendered forces create marginalization and subordination but also spaces for participation and contention ?

Yara SallamVisiting Faculty
Transitional Justice Officer, Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR)
Ms. Yara Sallam is the Transitional Justice officer at the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR). Yara previously worked as the Women Human Rights Defenders Program director at Nazra for Feminist Studies (Egypt), a professional legal assistant at the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR) in The Gambia, as a researcher on Freedom of Religion and Belief at EIPR, and as a research assistant at the Institute of Research for Development (IRD) focusing on women’s rights in Egypt. Yara earned two degrees of law (LL.B) – a Licence of Law from Cairo University in Egypt and Maîtrise of Commercial Law from Paris I University Pantheon Sorbonne in France in 2007. She has also been awarded a Master of Laws degree (LL.M.) in International Human Rights Law at the Law School of Notre Dame University, the United States of America (2010).
Term Assistant Professor of Practice, Sociology, Barnard College

J.C. Salyer is an anthropologist and a lawyer whose work focuses on law and society, immigration law, and social justice.   He is also the staff attorney for the Arab-American Family Support Center, a community-based organization in Brooklyn, and runs the organization’s immigration clinic.  His current research focuses on migration, disruption, and displacement related to climate change in the southwestern Pacific.

Associate Director, Barnard Center for Research on Women

Catherine Sameh is Associate Director of the Barnard Center for Research on Women, and managing editor of The Scholar & Feminist Online. She is also in charge of transnational collaborations with peer centers globally.

Rebecca SanchezVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of English, City University of New York

Rebecca Sanchez is an Assistant Professor of English at Fordham University and a member of the MLA’s Committee on Disability Issues in the Profession. Her research interests include transatlantic modernism, Deaf and disability studies and poetics. She is currently working on a book project entitled Deafening Modernism, which analyzes the impact of communicative norms on twentieth century writing.

Srishti SardanaGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, Teachers College, Columbia University
 Srishti Sardana is a graudate student at the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, Teachers College, Columbia University. She is also a Research Assistant at the New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University Medical Center. She has assisted on various projects with the aim to build skills needed to conduct high-impact mental health research in low-resource settings.
Abhay SardesaiVisiting Faculty
Smt. P. N. Doshi Women’s College of Arts

Abhay Sardesai has been the Editor of ART India, the premier art magazine of India, since November 2002. Under his editorship, the magazine has developed a Culture Studies-oriented approach and has become more inter-disciplinary in its theme-based explorations. He has been a Visiting Faculty in Aesthetics at the Department of English, University of Mumbai, and has also been the Chair of Humanities, Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute of Architecture, Mumbai. He teaches at the Smt. P. N. Doshi Women’s College of Arts and also at various other institutions like Jnanapravaha and TISS.

Barbara D. SavageVisiting Faculty
Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and Professor of History, University of Pennsylvania

Barbara D. Savage is Geraldine R. Segal Professor of American Social Thought and Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, where she has taught since 1995. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in twentieth century African American history; the history of American religious and social reform movements; and the history of the relationship between media and politics.

Asma SayeedVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA

Asma Sayeed is Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies at UCLA in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures. Her primary research interests are in early and classical Muslim social history, the intersections of law and social history, gender, and the history of Muslim education. Her book, Women and the Transmission of Religious Knowledge in Islam (Cambridge University Press) analyses Muslim women’s religious education, specifically their transmission of ḥadīth from the rise of Islam to the early Ottoman period.

Department of English, Rutgers University

Katherine Schaap Williams is a doctoral candidate in the department of English at Rutgers University. She has held fellowships from the graduate school and the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University, where she is a fellow in the 2011-2012 “Public Knowledge: Institutions, Networks, Collectives” seminar. Her research interests include sixteenth and seventeenth-century English literature and culture, disability studies, and performance theory, and she is writing a dissertation tentatively titled Irregular Bodies: Disability on the Early Modern Stage.

Michael SchwartzVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of Law and Director, Disability Rights Clinic, Syracuse University College of Law

Michael Schwartz, a deaf lawyer, is an associate professor of law and has been the director of the Disability Rights Clinic in the Office of Clinical Legal Education at the Syracuse University College of Law since August 2004.  Schwartz received his Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Brandeis University and a Master of Arts degree in Theater Arts from Northwestern University.  He then joined the National Theater of the Deaf and toured the United States as D’Artagnan in Dumas’s The Three Musketeers.

Professor of Anthropology

David Scott is Professor of Anthropology and Fellow in the Institute for Research in African American Studies, Columbia University, New York.

Professor of History, University of Florida

Professor Jon Sensbach received his Ph.D. in 1991 in early American history from Duke University, his B.A. in 1980 from the University of Virginia. He joined the University of Florida Department of History in 1998 after teaching at the College of William and Mary and the University of Southern Mississippi. He teaches the Department’s foundation graduate course on early America and has recently taught a graduate seminar on the Black Atlantic as well as undergraduate courses on the Atlantic slave trade, colonial America, and the American Revolution.

Sa'diyya ShaikhVisiting Faculty
Senior Lecturer, University of Cape Town

Working at the intersection of Islamic Studies and Gender Studies, Dr Shaikh has an interest in Sufism and its implications for Islamic feminism and feminist theory. Her book Sufi Narratives of Intimacy: Ibn ʿArabī, Gender and Sexuality is published by the University of North Carolina Press (2012). Her other areas of research cover issues of gender violence; feminist approaches to hadith and Quran; contraception and abortion; theoretical debates on Islam and feminism;  Engaged Sufism and empirical research on South African Muslim women.

Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law, Faculty of Law-Institute of Criminology and the School of Social Work and Public Welfare, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian is a longtime anti-violence, native Palestinian feminist activist and scholar. She is the Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law at the Faculty of Law-Institute of Criminology and the School of Social Work and Public Welfare at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Executive Director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma

Bruce Shapiro is Executive Director of the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, a project of Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism encouraging innovative reporting on violence, conflict and tragedy worldwide. An award-winning reporter on human rights, criminal justice and politics, Shapiro is a contributing editor at The Nation and U.S. correspondent for Late Night Live on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Radio National.

Kalpana SharmaVisiting Faculty

Kalpana Sharma is a Mumbai-based independent journalist, columnist and media consultant who writes for English language and Indian language publications in India. Until recently, she was Deputy Editor with The Hindu, one of India's leading English language dailies. Her special areas of interest are environmental and developmental issues and gender. She has written three books: Rediscovering Dharavi: Stories from Asia's Largest Slum (Penguin 2000), Whose News?

Surabhi SharmaVisiting Faculty

Surabhi Sharma is a filmmaker. She studied film direction at the Film and Television Institute of India (FTII), Pune, and made her first film in 2001. She completed a BA in Anthropology and Psychology from St. Xavier’s College, Mumbai University. Her films have been screened and awarded at various international and national festivals. She has also directed and scripted fiction films and Science Programming for children. Beyond this Surabhi Sharma is a guest lecturer at the National Institute of Design and at the Centre for Media and Cultural Studies, Tata Institute of Social Science.

Assistant Professor of Sociology and African American Studies, Columbia University

Carla Shedd is Assistant Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Columbia University. Her research and teaching interests focus on: crime and criminal justice; race and ethnicity; law; inequality; and urban sociology. Shedd has been published in the American Sociological Review, Sociological Methods & Research. She is the author of Unequal City: Race, Schools, & Perceptions of Injustice (2015).

Professor of Anthropology, BRAC University
Dina M. Siddiqi divides her time between New York and Dhaka, where she is Professor of Anthropology, BRAC University.
Tobin SiebersVisiting Faculty
V. L. Parrington Collegiate Professor, Professor of English and Art and Design, University of Michigan

Tobin Siebers is V. L. Parrington Collegiate Professor, Professor of English and Art and Design at the University of Michigan. He has been a fellow of the Michigan Society of Fellows and the John Simon Memorial Guggenheim Foundation and a Visiting Scholar at the Ecole Polytechnique in Paris.

Irina Carlota SilberVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of Anthropology, City University of New York

Irina Carlota (Lotti) Silber received her PhD from NYU and is currently an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the City College of New York (CCNY) in the Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, which is housed at the Center for Worker Education. She is also the Director of the MA Program in the Study of the Americas. She is the recipient of various dissertation fellowships (i.e.

Bertram SilvermanVisiting Faculty
Emiritus Professor of Economics, Hofstra University

Bertram Silverman is a professor of economics emeritus and former director of the Center for the Study of Labor and Democracy at Hosftra University.  He has worked as a trade union economist and has organized and directed a joint university-trade union college degree program for working adults.  Silverman has written about labor problems in the United States, Latin America, and Europe.  He is editor of Man and Socialism in Cuba: The Great Debate and co-editor with Murray Yanowitch of The Worker in “Post-Industrial” Capitalism; Labor and Democracy in the Tran

Associate Professor, Anthropology, Columbia University

Audra Simpson is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University. She is the author of Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States (Duke University Press, 2014), winner of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association’s Best First Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies Prize, the Laura Romero Prize from the American Studies Association as well as the Sharon Stephens Prize from the American Ethnological Society (2015). She is co-editor of Theorizing Native Studies (Duke University Press, 2014).

Simpreet SinghVisiting Faculty

Simpreet Singh is an Indian activist who since quitting his career as a successful engineer, has worked relentlessly on exposing housing scams and corruption in the city of Mumbai, where slum-dwellers are being evicted, in many cases unfairly, to make way for upmarket developments.

Nükhet SirmanVisiting Faculty
Professor of Sociology, Boğaziçi University

Professor of Sociology at Bogazici University.  She received a Bachelor of Arts  and PhD at the University College of London in 1976 and 1988 respectively.  Dr. Sirman’s areas of interest include gender, family and kinship, postcolonial societies, interpretive methods.

Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature
Joseph Slaughter teaches and publishes in the fields of postcolonial literature and theory, African, Caribbean, and Latin American literatures, postcolonialism, narrative theory, human rights, and 20th-century ethnic and third world literatures. His many publications include articles in Human Rights Quarterly, Research in African Literatures, The Journal of Human Rights, Politics and Culture, Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature. His essay, “Enabling Fictions and Novel Subjects: The Bildungsroman and International Human Rights Law,” appeared in a special issue on human rights of PMLA (October 2006) and was honored as one of the two best articles published in the journal in 2006-7.
Iván SmirnowGraduate Student
Psychologist, Gender and Culture Studies, Universidad de Chile

Iván Smirnow received his Bachelors of Science in Psychology at the Universidad Diego Portales, and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Personal Coaching and Leadership from the University of Barcelona. He plans to apply to the Masters Program in Gender and Culture Studies in Latin America, Department of Philosophy and Humanities a the Universidad de Chile with a proposed thesis: “Cuerpos-hechos-por/para-el-trabajo: cuerpo, memoria y trabajo precario.”

Carroll Smith-RosenbergVisiting Faculty
Professor Emeritus of History, University of Michigan

Carroll Smith-Rosenberg is the Mary Frances Berry Collegiate Professor of History, Women's Studies and American Culture, University of Michigan, Emerita. The author of several books and more than 40 essays on American history and culture and women's history, she has twice received the Binkley-Stephenson Award for best article in the Journal of American History. Her most recent book is This Violent Empire: The Birth of an American National Identity (2010).

Associate Professor of Journalism
Alisa Solomon directs the Arts & Culture concentration in the M.A. program at the Journalism School.
Wandana SonalkarVisiting Faculty
Professor, Dr. B. Ambedkar Marathwada University

She is Professor in Advanced Centre for Women's Studies, School of Development Studies at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences and Director of Tarabai Shinde Women's Studies Center.  She was a graduate in Mathematics, Economics at the University of Cambridge and recieved a Ph.D. in the Department of Economics at Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University.

Maboula SoumahoroVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor, English Department, Université François-Rabelais-Tours, France

Dr. Soumahoro is an Associate Professor in the English Department at the Université François-Rabelais-Tours, France. She has been a visiting lecturer in Africana Studies at Barnard College and at the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) at Columbia University (New York). She received her PhD magna cum laude from the English Department of the Université de Tours Francois-Rabelais (France). She has also been a Visiting Scholar in the History Department and the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) at Columbia University.

Associate Professor of English, Columbia University and Barnard College; Associate Director, Program in Narrative Medicine

Maura Spiegel has a joint appointment at Columbia University and Barnard College where she teaches literature, film and American Studies.  Associate director of the Program for Narrative Medicine at Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons, she teaches film to second-year medical students, as well as graduate students in the Master of Science Program in Narrative Medicine at Columbia.  Recently she ran a writing workshop for the staff of the NYU/Bellevue Program for Survivor’s of Torture.

Leo SpitzerVisiting Faculty
Visiting Professor of Oral History, Columbia

Leo Spitzer is the Vernon Professor of History Emeritus at Dartmouth College.

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak Executive Committee
University Professor, Columbia Unversity

Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak is University Professor and Founder of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society at Columbia University.  She was educated at the University of Calcutta, and came to Cornell University in 1961 to finish doctoral work.

Rahul SrivastavaVisiting Faculty

Having worked on their obsessions in parallel worlds for several years, Matias Echanove and Rahul Srivastava joined forces through their blog airoots/eirut in 2006. They have since written extensively on urban themes and engaged in projects involving planning, pedagogy, technology and activism. They are the co-directors of the Institute of Urbanology, which has offices in Mumbai and Goa (India).

Adjunct Professor, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race & Department of Anthropology
Elsa Stamatopoulou is Adjunct Professor, Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race & Department of Anthropology as well as Director, Indigenous Peoples' Rights Program at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights at Columbia University. Born in Athens, Greece, Stamatopoulou has devoted 21 years of her UN work to human rights, in addition to several years exclusively focusing on Indigenous Peoples rights.

Sarah Stillman directs the Global Migration Project at Columbia Journalism School, which offers several reporting fellows the opportunity to pursue stories on gender and migration, focusing on U.S. immigration law, border politics, international refugee policy, and more.

Joseph StrausVisiting Faculty
Distinguished Professor of Music, CUNY Graduate Center

Joseph Straus is Distinguished Professor of Music at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of numerous books and articles on topics in twentieth-century music, including Twelve-Tone Music in America (2009), Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory (3rd ed., 2004), Stravinsky's Late Music (2001), The Music of Ruth Crawford Seeger (1995), and Remaking the Past: Musical Modernism and the Influence of the Tonal Tradition (1990).

Marita SturkenVisiting Faculty
Professor and Chair, Department of Media, Culture, and Communication and Co-Director of the Visual Culture Program, NYU

Marita Sturken is Professor in the Department of Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University, where she teaches courses in visual culture, cultural memory, and consumerism.

Kirsten SwinthVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of History, Fordham University

My research interests center on the social and cultural history of the U.S. since World War II, but I have also written on the Gilded Age and Progressive Eras.  My focus is the intersections among gender, cultural, and labor and economic history.  I have a strong background in U.S. visual and popular culture as well, and have recently been teaching the history of American photography.  My training is in American Studies and I rely on an interdisciplinary approach in my work. 

Didier M. SylvainGraduate Student
Doctoral Candidate, Ethnomusicology, Columbia University
Didier Michel is a sound artist and PhD student in Ethnomusicology. His work focuses on the spiritual or phenomenological dimensions of “black” engagement with sound technology among Afrofuturist-identified music-makers and listeners in Haiti and the United States.
Neferti TadiarExecutive Committee
Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Neferti Tadiar is Professor and Chair of Women's Studies at Barnard College.  Her academic interests include transnational and third world feminisms; postcolonial theory; critical theories of race and subjectivity; literary and social theory; cultural studies of the Asia Pacific region; and Philippine studies. Her work concerns the role of cultural practice and social imagination in the production of wealth, power, marginality and liberatory movements in the context of global relations.

Amina TawasilVisiting Faculty
Visiting Lecturer at the International Studies Institute, University of New Mexico

Amina Tawasil's current research focus is on the intersection of women and Islamic education. With the support of the International and Transcultural Studies program at Teachers College, Columbia University, in the summer of 2008 she traveled to Tehran, Iran to conduct a two-month pilot study on the education of seminarian women in Iran, which became the main focus of her dissertation research.

Diana TaylorVisiting Faculty
University Professor, Performance Studies and Spanish and Founding Director, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, NYU

Diana Taylor is the author of Theatre of Crisis: Drama and Politics in Latin America (1991), which won the Best Book Award given by New England Council on Latin American Studies and Honorable Mention in the Joe E.

Aylin TekinerVisiting Faculty
Artist

Aylin Tekiner (b. 1978, Nevsehir, Turkey) is a New York/Istanbul based artist and activist. She undertook her B.A. and M.A. at Hacettepe University Fine Arts, Sculpture Department in Ankara, Turkey. In 2008 she received her PhD at Ankara University, Institute of Educational Sciences, Cultural Fundamentals of Education Department. Her book "Ataturk Statues: Cult, Esthetics, and Politics" evolved from her PhD thesis and was published by Iletisim Yayinlari (Turkey) in 2010. Aylin has had solo shows and participated in the group exhibitions in Turkey and New York.

Nash Professor of Law

Kendall Thomas is the Nash Professor of Law and co-founder and Director of the Center for the Study of Law and Culture at Columbia University in the City of New York. He joined the faculty in 1984 and his teaching and research interests include U.S. and comparative constitutional law, human rights, legal philosophy, feminist legal theory, Critical Race Theory and Law and Sexuality.

Assistant Professor of Economics, Barnard College

Anja Tolonen is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Barnard College. She works on economic development, with a specific focus on gender. Her recent work focuses on the local welfare effects of natural resource extraction in Africa, where she explores how mining investments affect employment inequality, women’s empowerment, and health. She teaches Development Economics and Women in Development Economics at Barnard.

Kate TrebussGraduate Student
English and Comparative Literature

Kate Trebuss is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Her dissertation, entitled "Critical Care: Medical Life Writing, Memory, and the Politics of Health," investigates how contemporary autobiographical stoies of illness and medical care facilitate the remembering and forgetting of certain histories and current conditions of violence, oppression, invisibility and inequality, as well as the connections between them.

Zeynep TürkyılmazVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor of History, Dartmouth College

Zeynep Türkyılmaz received her Ph.D. from the Department of History at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2009.  Her dissertation, "Anxieties of Conversion: Missionaries, State and Heterodox Communities in the Late Ottoman Empire," is based on intensive research conducted in Ottoman, British, and several American missionary archives. She was an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar Postdoctoral at UNC-Chapel Hill between 2009-2010 and Europe in the Middle East/ The Middle East in Europe Seminar Postdoctoral Fellow at Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin between 2010-2011.

Elena Tzelepis Visiting Faculty
Center for Advanced Study, Sophia

Elena Tzelepis has completed her Ph.D. in Philosophy at the New School for Social Research, New York. She works on social and political philosophy. She has taught at Columbia University and held visiting positions at the American University in Cairo and the University of Aegean, Greece.

Alanna ValdezGraduate Student
Philosophy, CUNY Graduate Center

Alanna Valdez is a Master’s student in philosophy at the City University of New York, Graduate Center. She also holds a Master’s degree in Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs from American University’s School of International Service, where she wrote her thesis on how the recently ratified UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities shifts disability rights to a human rights perspective. Her philosophical interests include: personhood, agency, and non-rational justifications for human rights.

Lindsay Van TineGraduate Student
Darshan VigneswaranVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Centre for Urban Studies, University of Amsterdam

Darshan Vigneswaran is currently an Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science and Centre for Urban Studies , University of Amsterdam. He is also a Senior Researcher at the African Centre for Migration and Society, WITS University. In 2008, he was a British Academy Fellow at the International Migration Institute, University of Oxford where he continues to serve as the reviews editor on the working paper series.

Class of 1933 Professor in the Humanities, Department of English & Comparative Literature

Gauri Viswanathan is Class of 1933 Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University.  She has published widely on education, religion, and culture; nineteenth-century British and colonial cultural studies; and the history of modern disciplines. She has held numerous visiting chairs, among them the Beckman Professorship at Berkeley, and was recently an Affiliated Fellow at the American Academy in Rome and a Visiting Mellon Scholar at the University of Cape Town. She has received Guggenheim, NEH, and Mellon fellowships, and was a fellow at various international research institutes. Prof.

Paromita VohraVisiting Faculty
Filmmaker

Paromita Vohra is a filmmaker, writer and curator whose work has focuses on urban life, popular culture, gender, politics and art. Her films have been widely screened in festivals, galleries and popular screening spaces, besides being included in university syllabi around the world.

Robert D. and Leslie Kay Raven Professor of Law in Access to Justice, University of California, Berkeley Law

Leti Volpp is the Robert D. and Leslie Kay Raven Professor of Law in Access to Justice at University of California, Berkeley Law. A noted scholar in law and the humanities who writes about citizenship, migration, culture and identity, Volpp’s honors include two Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowships, a MacArthur Foundation Individual Research and Writing Grant, and the Association of American Law Schools Minority Section Derrick A. Bell, Jr., Award.

Emmanuel Von SchackGraduate Student
Art History, Hunter College

Emmanuel von Schack is a deaf art history graduate student at Hunter College; his master's thesis focuses on German artists who were veterans of the First World War and the works of art they created during and after the War. By interweaving disability theories with Foucauldian feminist and queer theories, he explores the complex relationship between masculinity and disability as conveyed in Weimar culture and art. He works as an educator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Solomon R.

David WassermanVisiting Faculty
Director of Research, Center for Ethics, Yeshiva University

David Wasserman is Director of Research at the Center for Ethics at Yeshiva University. He oversees the research and scholarly activities of the Center with an emphasis on the philosophical aspects of bioethics, health care ethics, and disability studies. His current projects focus on prenatal selection and parental role-morality. He publishes widely on these and other topics. At Yeshiva University, Mr. Wasserman presents his research at faculty seminars and a variety of student events. He also presents his work at a wide range of national and international conferences.

Associate Professor, English and Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies, Columbia University

Jennifer Wenzel is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University. Areas of interest include: postcolonial theory and decolonization; African and South Asian literatures; environmental humanities; energy studies. Wenzel received her B.A. in English and History from Austin College in 1990; her M.A. in English from Indiana University in 1992; and her Ph.D. in English/Ethnic and Third World Literatures from the University of Texas at Austin in 1998.

Paige WestExecutive Committee
Professor of Anthropology, Barnard College, Columbia University
Paige West is Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University. Her broad scholarly interest is the relationship between societies and their environments. She has written about the linkages between environmental conservation and international development, the material and symbolic ways in which the natural world is understood and produced, the aesthetics and poetics of human social relations with nature, and the creation of commodities and practices of consumption. Since the mid 1990s she has worked with indigenous people in Papua New Guinea.
Laura WexlerVisiting Faculty
Professor of American Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies, Yale University

Laura Wexler is co-Principal Investigator of the Women, Religion and Globalization project. She is the author of Tender Violence: Domestic Visions in an Age of U. S. Imperialism (University of North Carolina Press, 2000) and Pregnant Pictures (Routledge, 2000), co-authored with Sandra Matthews. Tender Violence was awarded the 2001 annual Joan Kelley Memorial Prize of the American Historical Association for the best book in women’s history and/or feminist theory.

Sarah WilcoxVisiting Faculty
Professor of Sociology, Sarah Lawrence College

Sarah Wilcox is Professor of Sociology, Sarah Lawrence College. She specializes in medical sociology, the sociology of science and knowledge, gender and sexuality, and the mass media.  Her current research focuses on embodiment and biological knowledge, particularly how lay and expert knowledge intersect and when and how biological ideas become salient in embodied experience, personal identities, and popular culture.

James L. Dohr Professor of Law

B.A., Wellesley, 1972; J.D., Harvard, 1975. Practiced as deputy city attorney, Office of the Los Angeles City Attorney; and as staff lawyer, Western Center on Law and Poverty. Has served on the faculties of the University of Wisconsin School of Law, City University of New York Law School, and Golden Gate University School of Law. Has been at Columbia since 1991. Fellow, at the School of Criticism and Theory, Dartmouth College, and at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Deborah WillisVisiting Faculty
University Professor and Chair of Photography & Imaging, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU

Deb Willis has an affiliated appointment with the College of Arts and Sciences, Africana Studies. She was a 2005 Guggenheim Fellow and Fletcher Fellow, and a 2000 MacArthur Fellow, as well as the 1996 recipient of the Anonymous Was a Woman Foundation award. She has pursued a dual professional career as an art photographer and as one of the nation's leading historians of African American photography and curator of African American culture.

Associate Professor of Architecture, Planning and Preservation

Mabel O. Wilson navigates her multidisciplinary practice between the fields of architecture, art, visual cultural analysis, and American studies. Her scholarly and design research investigates space and cultural memory in black America, race and visual culture, and new technologies and the social production of space. Her scholarly essays have appeared in numerous journals and books on critical geography, cultural memory, art and architecture.

Penny WolfsonVisiting Faculty
Sarah Lawrence College; Narrative Medicine Program, Columbia University

Penny Wolfson won a National Magazine Award in Feature Writing in 2001 for an essay in The Atlantic Monthly called “Moonrise,” which has since been anthologized in several collections, including Best American Essays. Her memoir, Moonrise: One Family, Genetic Identity and Muscular Dystrophy, was published by St. Martin’s Press in 2003.

Autumn WomackVisiting Faculty
Assistant Professor, Department of English, University of Pittsburgh

Autumn Womack received her PhD from Columbia University where her research focused on 19th and early twentieth century African American literary culture. At Columbia she developed a rich interest in archival practices, visual studies, black print culture, and social science.

Sophia WongVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor of Philosophy, Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus

Sophia Isako Wong is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the Brooklyn Campus of Long Island University in New York, NY, USA. She has published on duties of justice to persons with intellectual disabilities, comparisons between sexism and discrimination against people with intellectual disabilities, and how the availability of PGD (preimplantation genetic diagnosis) affects the reproductive autonomy of prospective parents. Her current research analyzes the work of children and adolescents who provide care to their siblings, parents and other family members.

Alexa WoodwardGraduate Student
Graduate Student, Bioethics, Columbia University

Alexa Woodward is a newly accepted graduate student in the Bioethics program at Columbia University School of Professional Studies. She graduated with honors from California State University Chico with a B.S. in Cellular and Molecular Biology in 2015, having also competed an Honors Thesis focused on autonomy, futility, and end of life issues. After graduate school, she plans on attending medical school or pursuing a Ph.D. program. Outside of academia, Alexa is an ardent fitness enthusiast, artist, and vocalist.

Merieme YafoutVisiting Faculty
Merieme Yafout is a professor and researcher in social sciences. She is the author of several articles on “Islamic feminism in Morocco”, “female ijtihad”, “the status of women in Moroccan political parties”, “Islamist movements in Morocco,” “elections in Morocco,” and “field research in Morocco.”
Hairong YanVisiting Faculty
Anthropologist, Department of Applied Social Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Yan Hairong is an anthropologist in the Department of Applied Social Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University.  Her research interests are labour migration, rural-urban relations, and rural cooperatives in China, as well as Hong Konger/Mainlander relations and China/Africa links.
Armanc YıldızGraduate Student

Armanç Yıldız is currently working at Sabancı University's Gender and Women's Studies Forum and has recently finished his master's degree in International Performance Research. His master's thesis titled "Breathing through tolerance: Performing on the boundaries of (sexual) diversity on the streets of Amsterdam" has engaged with how the concept of tolerance depoliticized the LGBTI movement in the Netherlands and how it is being incorporated to produce inequalities towards non-white peoples, in spite of what the concept seem to offer in the first place.

Helen YitahVisiting Faculty
Associate Professor & Head, Department of English, University of Ghana

Helen Yitah is Associate Professor and Head of the Department of English, University of Ghana. She is also founding Director of the University of Ghana-Carnegie Writing Centre, established through her initiative. She holds a BA and MPhil from the University of Ghana and a PhD from the University of South Carolina, Columbia. She has taught various courses on literature and writing at both universities.

Gökçe YurdakulVisiting Faculty
Georg Simmel Professor of Diversity and Social Conflict, Humboldt University, Berlin

Gökçe Yurdakul is Georg Simmel Professor of Diversity and Social Conflict at the Humboldt University, Berlin Graduate School of Social Sciences.

She studied Sociology at the Bogazici University and Gender & Women’s Studies at the Middle East Technical University in Turkey. She has her PhD. from the University of Toronto, Department of Sociology where she received the Connaught Fellowship.

Rafia ZamanGraduate Student

Rafia Zaman is presently pursuing her doctoral thesis in Political Science at Jawaharlal Nehru University, India under the supervision of Prof. Gurpreet Mahajan. She is interested in the intersectionality of gender and identity politics represented by Muslim women. As part of her M.Phil, she wrote a dissertation on the topic “ ‘Islamic Feminism’: A Critical Appraisal”. Her current research focuses on Muslim women’s activism in India from the period following the Shah Bano controversy till the present.

Associate Professor of Gender, Conflict and Development, International Institute of Social Studies, The Hague
Dubravka Zarkov is Associate Professor of Gender, Conflict and Development at the International Institute of Social Studies, The Hague.